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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Weekly current affairs roundtable focusing on Indigenous issues and events. Hosted by Rick Harp.
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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs
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Now displaying: 2020
Nov 24, 2020

Decades of disruption and destruction later, massive portions of northern Manitoba have been effectively sacrificed for hydro mega-projects, to the seemingly exclusive and enduring benefit of urban interests to the south. Which makes it all the more urgent for a northern Indigenous coalition working to prevent such a fate for what’s said to be one of the last great wild places on Earth, the Seal River watershed. A pristine 50,000 square kilometre expanse of tundra, wetlands and forests, the area’s home not only to caribou and polar bears, birds and belugas, but to the people of the Sayisi Dene First Nation.

In this episode, host/producer Rick Harp sits with Stephanie Wood—Cultural Editor with The Narwhal—to discuss her latest piece, "The last free river of Manitoba," her look at how the Sayisi Dene and the rest of this unique coalition hope to protect the watershed from industrial development forever.

// CREDITS: Episode edited by Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 3, 2020

Voting day is just hours away in the USA, a day featuring a good number of Indigenous candidates at various levels: 111 in all, according to Indian Country Today. But even as some do their best to influence the outcome, others have serious questions about their effect, the kind of questions we got deep into over part one of our discussion. Here in part two, we talk about organizing vs. mobilizing, what some call ‘Voteps’ (and their possible Indigenous equivalents), how US and Canada Indigenous politics compare, economic democracy and more—including tentative efforts at predictions about what this week may bring.

Back at the table with host/producer Rick Harp are recovering Democrat Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, as well as special guest Trevor Beaulieu of the US-based podcast, “Champagne Sharks.”

// CREDITS: This episode was edited by Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 2, 2020

Election and Empire: with U.S. voting day just around the corner, what will November 3rd bring? Will it be a worsening of the Republican shit-show that is the Trump presidency or will it be a slide over to that other party? You know the one, the party that can’t even commit to a fracking ban during a climate crisis, much less health care for all its citizens in the midst of a pandemic? And yet, though the outcome may not be immediately clear come election night, what arguably won’t change is where non-Settler interests fit into the big picture of American politics. Be they Black, Indigenous, or people of colour, most such voters are not kidding themselves about whether settler colonialism or white supremacy are on the ballot. So what does that mean then for any marginalized population’s participation in the electoral process? How far does it go, and could or should these energies be more productively invested elsewhere?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp for the first half of this special, extended look at American politics are Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, as well as lawyer and podcaster Trevor Beaulieu, the driving force behind “Champagne Sharks,” a US-based current events program on race, politics, and pop culture, as seen through the lenses of humour and psychology.

// CREDITS: This episode was co-edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 29, 2020

Back to the border: part two of our extended look at a court case that should be getting more attention, but continues to fly under the radar of major Canadian media. At issue: the cross-border hunting rights of the Sinixt people, a people whose territory long pre-dates Canada, the U.S. and the man-made, imposed divide between them. A case in which Canada’s core argument rests on its claim that the Sinixt people are 'extinct.' But the Sinixt say reports of their demise are greatly exaggerated.

Back at the roundtable with host/producer Rick Harp are Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.

// CREDITS: This episode was edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. SFX: rattle by sandyrb; hawk cry by reidedo. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 24, 2020

Beyond borders: It’s the shot that continues to be heard across time and states. And it was roughly 10 years ago that an un-licensed Sinixt hunter named Rick Desautel took down an elk in what’s now called British Columbia, thus landing himself in provincial court. Thing is, he lives in what’s now called Washington state, south of a dividing line that does precisely that to ancestral Sinixt territory. In this episode—the first of a two-part discussion on this notable case (one seemingly under-covered in Canada)—host/producer Rick Harp is joined by Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta as well as Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC, as our show re-visits a fight for rights which precede the imposed border between the US and Canada.

// CREDITS: This episode was edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 16, 2020

It’s a gut-wrenching, even agonizing video. As a distraught, bed-ridden Joyce Echaquan pleads for help, a nearby nurse and an orderly at a Quebec hospital do not seem particularly concerned with her condition.

"You're stupid as hell," one can be heard saying in French: the other tells the mother of seven she’s made bad choices in life, asking what her children would think of her behaviour. Those comments—streamed live to Facebook by Echaquan herself—have sparked a firestorm of reaction. But the sad truth is, it’s only the latest example of a Canadian health care system that fundamentally, and fatally, fails Indigenous people. And yet, despite all evidence, there persists a stubborn refusal to see racism as a systemic, social determinant of Indigenous ill-health.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week to share their thoughts on this horrific incident and the reaction in its wake are Brock Pitawanakwat, York University Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.

// CREDITS: This episode was edited by Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 9, 2020

New sounds of the city. One of Canada’s largest centres—amiskwaciy-wâskahikan (aka Edmonton)—could be on the verge of Indigenizing the nomenclature of its political sub-divisions. Drawing on languages such as Blackfoot and Cree, the suite of newly-proposed names for Edmonton's 12 wards were recently voted on by city council, with a two-thirds majority favouring the switch. But there’s still a ways to go before it’s official, not to mention those critics who’d like these new names nullified.

At the roundtable this week with host/producer Rick Harp—who himself proudly called Alberta's capital city home for almost two years while at CBC—two Edmontonians extraordinaire: Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and Kim TallBear, associate professor in the U of A’s Faculty of Native Studies.

// CREDITS: This episode was edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. SFX: Rimshot by Simon_Lacelle. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 30, 2020

THIS WEEK: 'Chapter 2' of The Anti-Indigenous Handbook. A look into the "constellation of corporations, special interest organizations, politicians, lobbyists, and hate groups work[ing] to limit or eliminate… [Indigenous] self-determination,” the ‘Handbook’ gathers together reports from the US, Canada and Australia. In part one of our sit-down with two of its contributors, we discussed Guåhan (aka Guam), as documented by Leilani Rania Ganser, a CHamoru and Kānaka Maoli writer, storyteller, and organizer.  This time ‘round, we focus mostly on the story by Tristan Ahtone, a member of the Kiowa tribe and the editor in chief at The Texas Observer, who tells us how a university there shunted Indigenous people to the side.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Sep 30, 2020

The Anti-Indigenous Handbook: A collective effort spanning three countries, this 'Handbook' is the joint product of four media outlets: the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, The Guardian Australia, High Country News, and The Texas Observer.

And though each case embodies anti-Indigeneity in its own particular way, what they have in common are concerted, systematic efforts to "undermine [Indigenous] rights to land, resources, language, and culture … by relying on a variety of doctrines and practices that find root in scientifically false, racist, and legally invalid arguments."

In this first of a two-part discussion, host/producer Rick Harp sits down with two of the contributors to this initiative: Leilani Rania Ganser, a CHamoru (Jeje and Romeo Clans) and Kānaka Maoli writer, storyteller, and organizer who works to include traditional Pasifika methods of storytelling into journalism, research, and water, land, and medicine protection, as well as Tristan Ahtone, a member of the Kiowa tribe and the editor in chief at the Texas Observer.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 24, 2020

Settler panic in the Atlantic. Why do opponents of a new Mi’kmaq fishery in southwestern Nova Scotia speak as if it’s illegal when it has the support of a 21-year-old Supreme Court ruling? Why do they persist with arguments that the fishery could endanger the stock when not even 10 licenses are involved—an iota compared to the millions of pounds caught by the industry every year? And what might the UN Declaration on Indigenous rights have to say about all this?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this episode to discuss these questions and more are roundtable regulars Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, as well as Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 18, 2020

This week: Indigenous Gender and Sexuality Studies. A subject at the center of a talk delivered this past March by Dr. Jennifer Nez Denetdale, Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico, and the author of Reclaiming Diné History: The Legacies of Navajo Chief Manuelito and Juanita. Historic figures with a direct connection to Denetdale, as their great-great-great-granddaughter. But, as she argues in her presentation, it’s a history non-Diné often get wrong, especially on matters of gender and tradition. Yet her work isn’t confined to the academy; Denetdale also chairs the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission. We hear about both this episode—our final installment of the 2019/20 Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speaker Series, run by the University of Winnipeg’s Office of Indigenous Engagement.

// CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Aug 31, 2020

On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the last of our summer-long series), we bring you part two of our resource resistance retrospective. Yet, as part one revealed, these issues are hardly historical. Indeed, it was only six months ago that the Royal Canadian Militarized Police—in full riot gear and armed to the teeth—raided Wet’suwet’en activist camps for the second time in as many years to enforce an injunction secured by the Coastal GasLink corporation.

And though the raid signaled another setback to grassroots efforts to stop the pipeline, things seemed different this time around, both during and after the raid.

// CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes “Headway” and “Tumult” by Kai Engel, plus the following tracks by Andy G. Cohen: “Sheffield Hall” “Space (Outro),” “Scramby Eggs,” plus “Humming and Strumming.”

Aug 23, 2020

This week’s collected, connected conversations (the seventh in our summer-long series) make up the first part of a double-episode look at resource resistance, inspired by a struggle too big to ignore, one punctuated by striking video of back-to-back raids by militarized police against small Indigenous encampments in what's now known as interior British Columbia.

Yet these dramatic events of 2019 and 2020 in ancestral Wet’suwet’en territory are but part and parcel of a much bigger picture. Their resistance to resource extraction—pushback on a pipeline that, if built, would move 2.1 billion cubic feet of fracked natural gas per day—carries loud echoes of battles across the world, battles against a fossil-fueled climate catastrophe.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Hayden King, executive director, Yellowhead Institute at Ryerson University.

• Angela Sterritt, CBC Vancouver reporter and artist

• Wawmeesh Hamilton, journalist/photographer

• Ken Williams, Assistant Professor of Drama, University of Alberta

• Brock Pitawanakwat, York University Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies

• Kim TallBear, Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment

• Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the School of Journalism, Writing and Media at UBC

// CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes “Headway,” by Kai Engel, “Time” by Pedro Santiago, “Time to go home” by Anonymous420, “Habit” by Nctrnm, “One March Day” by smallertide, and “Aurora” by Kevin Hartnell.

Aug 15, 2020

On this episode’s collected, connected conversations (the sixth in our summer-long series): we get down with data and tight with tech, tackling topics that range from social media to social services.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta

• Ken Williams, assistant professor, University of Alberta department of drama

• Karyn Pugliese, Assistant Professor, School of Journalism, Ryerson University

• Lisa Girbav, broadcaster and podcaster

• Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the School of Journalism, Writing and Media at UBC

• Jennifer Walker, Canada research chair in Indigenous Health at Laurentian University; core scientist and Indigenous lead with IC/ES North

// CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes “Headway” and “Harbor” by Kai Engel, The Institute Laboratories and Careful now, Stalker by ROZKOL, RENDER ME - Single by Nctrnm, Robot is chilling by Frederic Lardon, “Black & Blue” by Breath Before the Plunge, and “Sector Vector”, by Little Glass Men.

Aug 7, 2020

On this episode’s collected, connected conversations (the fifth in our summer-long series): navigating the harms and hopes associated with drugs. From alcohol to opioids, taxes to testing, you could say we’ve explored our fair share of substances on this show. Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta

• Tim Fontaine, head honcho at satirical news site Walking Eagle News

• Solomon Israel, cannabis industry reporter

• Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama

• Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University

• Patrice Mousseau, entrepreneur

• Colleen Simard, freelance writer, clothing designer and filmmaker

• Conrad Prince, Indigenous health and child welfare advocate

• Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker

// CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes Headway,” by Kai Engel, No Moon” by Unheard Music Concepts, “Mechanics Of Leaving” by Haunted Me, The Apotheosis of All Deserts, by ROZKOL, “Open Door” and “The Jewel and Me” by Little Glass Men, “The Pear In The Garden” by Kevin Hartnell, as well as “Ride to the party” by Anonymous420.

Jul 31, 2020

On this week’s collage of collected, connected conversations (the fourth in our summer series): appropriation and authenticity. The second half of our extended foray into the arts, our topics range from tacky souvenirs to the endless parade of Settlers pining to play Indian, as we question the images of Indigenous people: who gets to make and profit by them, as well as what is and isn’t considered ‘authentic.’ Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta's Department of Drama

• Brock Pitawanakwat, York University Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies

• Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta

• Taté Walker, Lakota activist and communications professional

// CREDITS: This episode was produced and edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. Creative Commons music in this episode includes “Headway,” by Kai Engel, “Startup nation” by Anonymous 420, “On the Run” by ROZKOL, “Dead From The Beginning Alive Till The End,” by Doctor Turtle, Behind Our Efforts, Let There Be Found Our Efforts by LG17, plus “Home Base Groove and “Quasi_Motion” by Kevin Macleod.

Jul 23, 2020

On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the third in our summer series), the arts take centre stage. A stage so wide, it’ll take two acts to cover it all. For our first act, we look at representation and misrepresentation, be it on-screen, on stage, or on the page. From gatekeepers to white fragility, it ain’t easy trying to be Indigenous in this industry.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Cutcha Risling Baldy, Assistant Professor and Department Chair of Native American Studies at Humboldt State University.

• Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism

• Kim TallBear, Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta

• Brock Pitawanakwat, York University Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies

• Ken Williams, University of Alberta Assistant Professor of Drama

• Taté Walker, Lakota activist and communications professional

• Jessica Ka'nhehsí:io Deer, a Kanien'kehá:ka journalist at CBC Indigenous

// CREDITS: This episode was produced and edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. Creative Commons music in this episode includes “Headway,” by Kai Engel, L'Etoile danse (Pt. 1) by Meydän, Jolenta Clears The Table by Doctor Turtle, “New Years Day” by Breath Before the Plunge, “Love” by Steve Combs, and “Lost_Forever” by Little Glass Men.

Jul 15, 2020

In our second summer series collection of connected conversations: a checkup on the state of Indigenous health. A thorough examination of how the Canadian health system can all too often operate against Indigenous well-being via ill-considered policies and practices. Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Mary Jane McCallum, professor of history at University of Winnipeg

• Dr. James Makokis, a Cree physician based in Alberta

• Dr. Lisa Richardson, clinician-educator, University of Toronto division of general internal medicine; joint strategic lead in Indigenous Health, U of T Faculty of Medicine

• Dr. Jason Pennington, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto; Scarborough General Hospital staff surgeon; joint strategic lead in Indigenous Health, U of T Faculty of Medicine

• Colleen Simard, writer/designer/filmmaker

• Conrad Prince, child health and welfare advocate

• Pam Palmater, Chair in Indigenous Governance, Ryerson University’s department of Politics and Public Administration

• Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University

• Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

• Amy Bombay, Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and the School of Nursing at Dalhousie University

• Danika Billie Littlechild, lawyer and international Indigenous rights advocate

• Robert Jago, writer/entrepreneur

// CREDITS: This episode was produced and edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. Creative Commons tracks in this episode include Headway” and “Interception” by Kai Engel, “Isolated” by Kevin MacLeod, “Carnival” and “There are Places” by smallertide, “Comadreamers I” by Haunted Me, “Chalet” by Meydän, plus “A Perceptible Shift” and “A Human Being” by Andy G. Cohen.

Jul 7, 2020

Once again this year, we at MEDIA INDIGENA have dug deep into our archives to bring you a summer-long series of collected, connected conversations, on a variety of topics: from drugs to data, the arts to activism. We begin with a subject some argue has always been at the heart of the Canadian project: genocide. Once dismissed outright as an object of any serious consideration in this country, there is today a compelling case to be made that Canada's past and present actions merit the label of genocide.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Ryerson University professor Chris Powell, author of Barbaric Civilizations: A Critical Sociology of Genocide

• Historian James Daschuk, author of Clearing the Plains: Disease, the Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life

• Brock Pitawanakwat, associate professor of Indigenous studies at York University

• Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

• Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC

• Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment

// CREDITS: This episode was produced and edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. Creative Commons music in this episode includes the tracks “Headway,” and “Evermore” by Kai Engel. Other tracks were “A Vital Piece of Music for All Your Soundtrack Needs,” by Steve Combs and “Dark Room,” by XTaKeRuX.

Jun 30, 2020

THIS WEEK: A systemic look at media. It’s the second half of our extended conversation with our very own Candis Callison and Mary Lynn Young, co-authors of Reckoning: Journalism’s Limits and Possibilities. Published by Oxford University Press, it’s the work of former practitioners in the field who now study and teach the craft at the University of British Columbia’s School of Journalism, Writing and Media.

In part one of our discussion, we covered what kind of tool journalism is, and how the field tends to idealize itself, seemingly unaware of its continual performance of white masculinity. Here in part two, we get into what Callison and Young refer to as ”systems journalism,” an approach that moves storytellers away from a disinterested, objective 'view from nowhere' to a greater self-awareness about the murky, often choppy waters of identities and interests they themselves swim in. It's a call for journalism to work harder to make more visible and legible the social, economic, political, even biological structures that order all of our lives.

// MUSIC: Our theme is ‘nesting’ by birocratic. Other music this episode: “Backed Vibes Clean” by Kevin MacLeod. Hear more of their work at incompetech.com. Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Jun 21, 2020

On this episode: part one of our extended conversation on the limits and possibilities of journalism. And these days, we hear little about the latter, a lot about the former—even before COVID-19 took its toll on the industry.

Some blame media companies’ downfall on the digital: the interwebs and smartphones shredding the business model of now-obsolete oligopolies.

And yet, it’s not all cause for techno-driven doom and gloom. In fact, there are those who believe digital might actually be a doorway to better journalism, especially for those audiences legacy outlets have failed to reach, much less represent. Among the hopeful: Candis Callison and Mary Lynn Young, Associate Professors at UBC's School of Journalism, Writing and Media and the co-authors of Reckoning: Journalism’s Limits and Possibilities, a book about the media moment we’re living through, a time where crisis and opportunity co-exist.

// MUSIC: Our theme is ‘nesting’ by birocratic. Other music this episode: 'Clean Soul,' by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License.

Jun 12, 2020

THIS WEEK: NAISA INDIGENA. And just who or what is a “NAISA”? It’s the Native American Indigenous Studies Association. Or as they put it, a “professional organization for scholars, graduate students, independent researchers, and community members interested in all aspects of Indigenous Studies.” Many of whom gather every year to share and discuss their scholarship. And this year, that included us! And then, just like that, COVID-19 took out NAISA 2020. What’s a roundtable to do? Well, lemons do make for great lemonade, so get ready for some bittersweetness as we stage a roundtable about the roundtable.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp are Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University Brock Pitawanakwat, Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 6, 2020

THIS WEEK: Food and environmental justice. Topics at the heart of a talk given back in February by Dr. Priscilla Settee, Professor of Indigenous Studies at the University of Saskatchewan, and Adjunct Professor for the Natural Resources Institute at the University of Manitoba.

A global educator and activist from Cumberland House Swampy Cree First Nations with a keen interest in Indigenous food sovereignty, she can now add David Suzuki Fellow to her list of accomplishments, a way to take her research deeper into the impacts of climate change on the environment and livelihoods of northern trappers.

As with the other 2019/20 Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speaker Series lectures, Settee sat down immediately after her presentation—“The Impact of Climate Change and Environmental Degradation on Indigenous Knowledge Systems: What You Should Know”—to discuss her ideas further with MEDIA INDIGENA host/producer Rick Harp, an opportunity courtesy of the University of Winnipeg’s Office of Indigenous Engagement.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 30, 2020

THIS WEEK: The ‘Looting’ of America. As if a pandemic wasn’t enough to contend with, disturbing video came out on social media this week of blatant police brutality against a black resident of the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, video that has sparked outrage in streets across the US. Outrage met with tear gas, smoke bombs and rubber bullets. Meanwhile, as can happen in such highly-charged, volatile situations, property has been damaged, even destroyed. People vs. property: guess how the media weighed harms carried out against both in their coverage—or how well their stories convey the role and function policing plays in the everyday lives of black and brown people? Joining host/producer Rick Harp to discuss these questions and more this week were Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC, as well as Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 26, 2020

On this week’s episode: “Indigenous Knowledge and Heavens,” the title of a talk delivered earlier this year by Inuk scholar, Dr. Karla Jessen Williamson.

An Assistant Professor of Educational Foundations at the University of Saskatchewan, the Greenland-born academic is the first Inuk to be tenured at a Canadian university.

Following Williamson’s lecture—the fourth in the 2019/20 Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speaker Series, organized by the University of Winnipeg’s Office of Indigenous Engagement—she sat down with MEDIA INDIGENA host/producer Rick Harp to discuss gender relations in post-colonial Greenland Inuit communities, and why she argues “genderlessness” is closer to their realities.

// This episode edited by Rick Harp and Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

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