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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Weekly current affairs roundtable focusing on Indigenous issues and events. Hosted by Rick Harp.
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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs
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Now displaying: March, 2020
Mar 28, 2020

THIS WEEK: Could the benefits of hindsight foreshadow the costs to come? As we discussed last episode, the collision of colonialism and COVID-19 carries additional layers of risk for remote and urban Indigenous populations. Among those already impacted, dozens of confirmed cases on the Navajo Nation in the American southwest and two presumptive cases on a northern Saskatchewan First Nation including a nurse who tested positive after travel abroad. The kind of scenario that’s prompted multiple First Nations and tribes to restrict access to their communities.

Could history be repeating itself? We hear from Indigenous health historian Mary Jane McCallum, a Canada Research Chair in Indigenous People, History and Archives and University of Winnipeg history professor.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 19, 2020

THIS WEEK: Flattening the curve, feeling the gap. COVID-19, the virus that first popped up in Wuhan, China, is now officially a global pandemic. And even though the vast majority of people who get COVID-19 will ultimately suffer either mild or even no symptoms, it’s the most vulnerable among us that we need to worry about and look out for. So far in Canada, that’s largely meant promoting hand hygiene and social isolation. The goal: to stop a huge spike in cases to keep the healthcare system from being overwhelmed. But as governments work to keep Canadians’ demands on the system on a long, low curve, all too many Indigenous people could find they’re trapped in a gap. Multiple public health gaps, in fact, which, taken together, could compound the challenges facing prevention, treatment and containment of the virus among First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp to discuss this gap, including what some are doing to mitigate it, are two returning guests: Dr. Lisa Richardson, clinician-educator with the University of Toronto's division of general internal medicine, and Dr. Jason Pennington, a staff surgeon at Scarborough General Hospital and an assistant professor at the University of Toronto. Together, they serve as strategic leads in Indigenous Health with the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Mar 10, 2020

When a company in one country is linked to human rights abuses in another, should they be held responsible for that abuse back home? According to Canada’s Supreme Court, yes! Which means a Canadian mining company operating in northeast Africa could stand trial for alleged violations of human-rights in the state of Eritrea.

In this episode, host/producer Rick Harp is joined by Candis Callison, associate professor in UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, as they dig deep into what broadening liability might mean for other Canadian companies extracting billions in resources from Indigenous territories across the globe.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Mar 1, 2020

THIS WEEK: Is Alberta becoming a police-state? At least one critic thinks so, after the province’s recent introduction of Bill 1. Labelled the “Critical Infrastructure Defence Act," the bill will, in the words of the Premier, create new “stiff penalties for anyone who riots on or seeks to impair critical economic infrastructure.” Penalties he says are necessary in light of the “general atmosphere of lawlessness” created by recent Wet'suwet'en solidarity actions across the country.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week to discuss the bill and why some fear its repercussions for activism (not least, Indigenous activism) are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

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