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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Weekly current affairs roundtable focusing on Indigenous issues and events. Hosted by Rick Harp.
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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs
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Now displaying: May, 2021
May 29, 2021

Pollution is Colonialism Part Two: fresh off part one, host/producer Rick Harp and MI regular Candis Callison once again sit down with author, artist and marine scientist Max Liboiron. And in the back half of this extended conversation, we find out why Land is not so much a noun as it is a verb, and why anti-colonial is not the same as de-colonial, especially when it comes to methods for pollution science, methods which foreground values of humility, equity, and good land relations.

// CREDITS: ‘Smoke Factory,’ by Jahzzar (CC BY 3.0); our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 27, 2021

Pollution is Colonialism: the straight-to-the-point title of a brand new book by Max Liboiron, Assistant Professor of Geography and Associate Vice-President of Indigenous Research at Memorial University, as well as the Director of CLEAR, or Civic Laboratory for Environmental Action Research. Among the book's core arguments: that any effort looking to resist environmental harms must trace them back to their ultimate source—the violence of colonial land relations. A violence, the author argues, even well-intentioned environmental science and activism can reproduce. In this first of two episodes featuring the author, we discuss how the world became awash in plastics, with part two dedicated to how we might better grasp and grapple with the larger forces producing this toxic legacy.

Appearing alongside Dr. Liboiron, host/producer Rick Harp and MI regular Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.

// CREDITS: 'Quiet Outro' by ROZKOL (CC BY 3.0); Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 23, 2021

This week: redress, compensation and restitution. In short, Cash Back! It's the second half of our effort to put meat on the bones of this call for First Nations economic justice issued in the latest Red Paper of the Yellowhead Institute—viewable at cashback.yellowheadinstitute.org—as we run through the 'Top 10' ways to actually get that cash back from Canada.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp once again are Tim Thompson and Naiomi Metallic of the Yellowhead Institute.

// Our musical theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 15, 2021

From Wealth to Welfare. Just how did Canada’s economy end up among the world's largest, anyway? Was it the sheer pioneering pluck of can-do Canucks? A steely determination tempered by visionary imagination and innovation? Exactly what has Canada done to amass, command and enjoy such wealth? Well, according to a hot-off-the-presses report from the Yellowhead Institute, they stole it. Entitled Cash Back: A Yellowhead Institute Red Paper, the report impressively details what can only be described as a colossal, colonial theft, the proceeds of which Canada continues to exploit and extract. Adding insult to imperial injury, not only has this country built itself up via the "transformation of Indigenous lands and waterways into corporate profit and national power," the report's authors argue it's forced "a cradle-to-grave bureaucracy" upon First Nations in the process, placing a "stranglehold on [their] each and every need." The result: a zero-sum economic game, a game Canada’s rigged in its favour to the ongoing detriment of First Nations.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp for part one of this extended conversation about the report are two of its contributors: co-author and board member Naiomi Metallic, as well as Yellowhead Research Fellow Karihwakè:ron aka Tim Thompson.

// CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 1, 2021

DILEMMA INDIGENA: For Indigenous peoples living under settler colonialism today, there are few choices that aren’t constrained, a predicament at the heart of a discussion in the brand new book, Regime of Obstruction: How Corporate Power Blocks Energy Democracy.

Just published by Athabasca University Press, its 30-plus contributors include this week’s special guest, Clifford Atleo, an Assistant Professor of Resource & Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University, who joins us to discuss his chapter, “Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Canada’s Carbon Economy and Indigenous Ambivalence.”

// CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

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