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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Weekly current affairs roundtable focusing on Indigenous issues and events. Hosted by Rick Harp.
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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs
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Mar 10, 2020

When a company in one country is linked to human rights abuses in another, should they be held responsible for that abuse back home? According to Canada’s Supreme Court, yes! Which means a Canadian mining company operating in northeast Africa could stand trial for alleged violations of human-rights in the state of Eritrea.

In this episode, host/producer Rick Harp is joined by Candis Callison, associate professor in UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, as they dig deep into what broadening liability might mean for other Canadian companies extracting billions in resources from Indigenous territories across the globe.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Mar 1, 2020

THIS WEEK: Is Alberta becoming a police-state? At least one critic thinks so, after the province’s recent introduction of Bill 1. Labelled the “Critical Infrastructure Defence Act," the bill will, in the words of the Premier, create new “stiff penalties for anyone who riots on or seeks to impair critical economic infrastructure.” Penalties he says are necessary in light of the “general atmosphere of lawlessness” created by recent Wet'suwet'en solidarity actions across the country.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week to discuss the bill and why some fear its repercussions for activism (not least, Indigenous activism) are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 24, 2020

This week: Choosing our words carefully. When discussing those who oppose resource extraction, how important is it to call them protectors rather than protesters? And when it comes to the members of a dominant society horny for such extraction, how vital is it that they be called Settlers? Judging by the dust these debates still kick up, a lot! And wouldn’t you know it, among those kicking was our own Candis Callison, associate professor in the School of Journalism at UBC. Also at the roundtable this week with host/producer Rick Harp is Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 16, 2020

Tired of how the media has covered its event in recent years, an all-Indigenous basketball tournament in BC has decided it's had enough of 'negative press.' With one exception—a First Nations radio station that broadcasts the games live—other media hoping to cover the event have been denied access. Meanwhile, a Toronto playwright has made a point of discouraging non-Indigenous critics from reviewing her work. In this episode, we’ll discuss what these two attempts to influence who says what about whom may (or may not) have in common.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable this time around are University of Alberta Department of Drama Assistant Professor Ken Williams and at York University Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies Brock Pitawanakwat.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 10, 2020

THIS WEEK: Wet'suwet'en Redux. It’s an ever-changing story, yet all-too-reminiscent of other Indigenous struggles—and that’s just in supposedly pro-UNDRIP British Columbia. With #ShutCanadaDown solidarity rallies and blockades going up in different parts of Canada and beyond, we look at how police actions this time around compare to last year’s RCMP raid of the anti-pipeline, pro-sovereignty encampments in ancestral Wet'suwet'en territory.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week are Candis Callison, associate professor in the School of Journalism at UBC, and Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 31, 2020

THIS WEEK: Part 2 of our discussion on APTN’s new retrospective docuseries, “The Power Was With Us: Idle No More.” Picking up where Kim, Candis and Rick left off last episode—when they discussed the movement’s genesis—this time ‘round, Ken Williams (assistant professor, University of Alberta department of drama) and Brock Pitawanakwat (York University Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies) join Rick to explore the various crossroads confronting the different parties active at the time—and the consequences of their choices. To watch the series (co-directed and co-produced for APTN National News by Mr. Harp and Tim Fontaine), stream it via APTN’s Lumi service. To do so, visit aptnlumi.ca.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 30, 2020

This week, the emergence of Idle No More, the Indigenous-led movement that’s arguably changed Canada forever. Now its arrival on the Canadian political scene is the subject of a major APTN National News retrospective docuseries, co-directed and co-produced by Rick Harp and Tim Fontaine.

Entitled “The Power Was With Us: Idle No More,” the first of the two-part series is now available exclusively on LUMI—the streaming service of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (aptnlumi.ca).

Joining Rick with their reflections are Candis Callison, associate professor in the School of Journalism at UBC and now with the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies, as well as Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 24, 2020

Once again, our podcast features a conversation based on our partnership with the Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speakers Series, a series made possible by the University of Winnipeg’s Office of Indigenous Affairs. This time, we hear from Dr. Karyn Recollet, Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto’s Women & Gender Studies Institute, and a Cree woman originally from the Sturgeon Lake First Nation in Saskatchewan. The title of her talk: “Quilted Glyphs: Theories of Speculative Landings for Indians on the Move.”

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 12, 2020

On this week’s program: awakening ancestral languages. Our very first episode of 2020 sees us return to our partnership with the Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speakers Series, sponsored by the University of Winnipeg’s Office of Indigenous Affairs. This time around, we’ll hear from Dr. Margaret Noodin, Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and director of the Electa Quinney Institute for American Indian Education. She’s also a poet and passionate advocate for Anishnaabemowin language revitalization.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Dec 31, 2019

If you’re active on Twitter maybe you’ve seen it—the fuss some have kicked up over Donald Trump’s recent use of the phrase “Indian Country” in a tweet. But look carefully among those the most fussed: what you won’t find are many, if any, “Indians.” On this week’s Indigenous roundtable, we climb into this cross-cultural chasm of criticism, and discuss why even those ever-vigilant #NativeTwitter types feel there’s way bigger fish to fry.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp for the final show of the decade are Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies.

// CREDITS: ‘nesting’ by birocratic (opening/closing theme); ‘Ukulele Song,’ by Rafael Krux (orchestralis.net)

Dec 26, 2019

Did you know it’s been roughly four years since Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission issued its final report? If all you follow is mainstream media, likely not: which is odd, because the work of the TRC very much remains open in the form of its 94 Calls to Actionfew of which are anywhere near complete.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp to share their assessment of where Canada stands on those Calls are Ryerson University's Eva Jewell (Assistant Professor of Sociology) and Ian Mosby (Assistant Professor of History). An assessment recently published by the Yellowhead Institute in its brief, “Calls To Action Accountability: A Status Update On Reconciliation.”

CREDITS: Opening/closing theme is 'nesting,' by birocratic; interstitial is 'Holiday Gift' by Kai Engel (CC BY 4.0).

Dec 24, 2019

On this week’s Indigenous roundtable: Taking control, taking stock. How a First Nation in Ontario decided the only way they’re going to find images of Indigenous people that don’t rely on stereotypes is to make their own catalogue of stock photography.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp to discuss how literally owning your own depictions is key to cultural self-determination are Kim TallBear (University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies) and Candis Callison (Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism).

CREDITS: This episode of the podcast was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; hosted and produced by Rick Harp. Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Dec 15, 2019

THIS WEEK: The Bureaucrats’ Burden. Could there be any job tougher than running Indian Affairs? Sources at Indian Affairs say “No!” According to a recent Global News story, senior officials at Indigenous Services Canada wish Canadians better understood all the great work they do, something they say has been "difficult" to communicate "effectively" thanks to obstacles like... Twitter bots?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week to discuss this departmentaI dismay (and diagnosis) are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University Brock Pitawanakwat.

CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic; SFX: Robot;  Broken Telephone Circuit

Nov 29, 2019

This week: Bringing blood home. Over a half-century after their removal, a large cluster of blood samples from Indigenous islanders in Australia have been returned to whence they came. The result of direct negotiations with the affected community, the move has been held up as historic for the country. But if Australia’s on the bleeding edge of repatriation, what about the rest of the world? From skin to saliva, blood to bones, do we even know how much Indigenous material has been banked across the globe? And should we put repatriation under the banner of reconciliation?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp to take the pulse of these and other questions are University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies Kim TallBear, as well as Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 25, 2019

“What was CBC North management thinking?” A question fresh on the mind of CBC audiences and CBC staff this week, shocked and dismayed at the decision to combine three territorial morning newscasts into one. A decision that proved short-lived, however: even before the ink was dry, CBC brass buckled under the backlash and reversed course.

In this discussion, host/producer Rick Harp is joined by Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, as well as Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism as they try to parse out the ‘logic’ behind the move, what it tells us about how well CBC gets the north, as well as what it would take—and who—to make things right going forward.

// CREDITS: This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Nov 18, 2019

This week, class dismissedor should we say class denied? A North Carolina advisory board has rejected a proposed Native charter school on the grounds its curriculum would be too radical. Of course, that’s all in the eyes of the beholder, but with funding all in the hands of the state, could this be a textbook case of education discrimination? And nearly a half century after the 1970s rallying cry “Indian Control of Indian Education,” how close is anyone to realizing that vision?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp on the roundtable this week are Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the department of drama at the University of Alberta, and U of A associate professor of Native Studies Kim TallBear.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 11, 2019

It’s a dilemma that confronts much of Indigenous media: with so much of our time spent working to counter, correct and contextualize mainstream misinformation, do we not risk becoming “This Week in Settler Colonialism”? Does routinely responding to routine violations of our lands and lives see us become all-consumed by what the State does and doesn’t do? How do we resist that pull of a Settler center of gravity, and stop merely critiquing, and start actually creating outside of its orbit?

Questions on our minds a lot these days as we begin a conversation on where else we might invest our attention and intentions, to build on our original mission as an Indigenous reality check on the misrepresentations of Settler-oriented media.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week are Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University.

CREDITS: This episode of the podcast was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; hosted and produced by Rick Harp. Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Oct 30, 2019
This week, the back half of our post-Canadian-election post-mortem, featuring the Yellowhead Institute’s Hayden King and Vanessa Watts. In part one of our discussion, we compared the relative prominence of so-called Indigenous issues this election versus the one before. Here in part two, we more concretely explore the likely machinations of a minority Parliament and how Indigenous interests might shake out. We also go deeper into Indigenous electoral participation: be it as voters or vote-getters, is it worth the return on investment?
 
CREDITS // This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; hosted and produced by Rick Harp. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.
Oct 25, 2019

Barely 3 days after the Liberals' return to power -- only this time, as a minority government -- we wonder what that could mean for Indigenous peoples going forward. Did Indigenous issues make a difference this election? Did Indigenous voters?

Joining us this week to tackle these questions and more are two members of the Yellowhead Institute, a First Nation-led research centre based in the Faculty of Arts at Ryerson University: Executive Director Hayden King as well as Research Fellow Vanessa Watts. 

CREDITS: This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; produced and hosted by Rick Harp. Special thanks to our friends at the Ryerson School of Journalism, whose support made this live event possible. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 14, 2019

It's been quite the week for the bottom-line of Canadian colonialism. First, a blunt assessment of what the lives of First Nations' kids are worth as the Liberals push to quash compensation for damage done by the child welfare system. Then, as part of an election scrum, a reporter casually suggests that covering the cost of access to safe, clean drinking water on-reserve amounts to writing a "blank cheque."

So how is it that resolving a basic necessity and a fundamental inequity can both be framed as, if not implausible, at least impractical for a so-called developed economy? What do we make of a mainstream mindset that bristles at the cost of making either of these situations right? And under such a colonial calculus, is it any wonder who ultimately pays the price? Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week to crunch the numbers are Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

CREDITS // This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 8, 2019

This week, grousing over Greta. Even though millions recently took to the streets as part of world-wide Climate Strikes, the media still seems to reserve most of its spotlight for the teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg. And yet, not everyone’s a fan: from Maxime Bernier to Vladimir Putin, she seems to irk white cis male politicians in particular. But the idolatry of Thunberg has also received pushback from parts of Native Twitter, frustrated at how she seemingly gets all the accolades while Indigenous youth and youth of colour toil in relative obscurity.

On this week's live-audience edition of MEDIA INDIGENArecorded in Edmonton as part of LitFest's 'Author Pods' event serieswe get into these Greta grumbles as a springboard into a larger discussion about allyship, white saviourism and the pros and cons of personifying and celebrifying a people’s movement.

On stage with host/producer Rick Harp were Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the department of drama at the University of Alberta, and U of A associate professor of Native Studies, Kim TallBear.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 29, 2019
This week: taking the measure of data about Indigenous peoples. It's a bit of a departure from our usual roundtable formatthe first of our live audience discussions connected to the annual Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speakers Series, sponsored by the University of Winnipeg’s Office of Indigenous Affairs. Starting us off is Dr. Jennifer Walker, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Health at Laurentian University and Scientist and Indigenous Lead with IC/ES North.
 
 
// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.
Sep 18, 2019

Who’da thunk it? For once, we at MEDIA INDIGENA are happy to be wrong—right out of the gate at the first leaders debate, Indigenous issues are on the radar of Canada’s federal election. But will they continue to enjoy that spotlight? And among those leaders who did take part in that first to-and-fro, who got it right and who got it left when it comes to 'Indigenous affairs'? Sharing their thoughts this week with host/producer Rick Harp are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

CREDITS:

Phone hangup SFX: https://freesound.org/s/189727/

Music: 'Cup of Wine,' by Ilya Truhanov from Fugue; 'nesting' by birocratic

Sep 15, 2019

This week: the not-so-amazing race to form Canada's next government! That’s right: it's federal election time from now until October 21. But will Indigenous interests factor much if at all into this election? We discuss the recent efforts by the Assembly of First Nations to make sure that happens. Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable are Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama. 


// CREDITS: Music: 'nesting' by birocratic (theme), 'Cup of Wine' by Ilya Truhanov from Fugue. Phone hangup SFX: https://freesound.org/s/189727/

Sep 8, 2019

From the second it hit social media, the new ad campaign for the House of Dior’s so-called 'Sauvage' cologne kicked up a stink. In fact, as soon as Native Twitter got wind of the new video—starring the notorious Johnny Depp—the blowback was fast, furious and less than fragrant. In our return to all-new episodes, we try to make 'scents' of why Indian Country’s collective nose is so out of joint.

Back at the roundtable are Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism and Kim TallBear, Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

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