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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Weekly current affairs roundtable focusing on Indigenous issues and events. Hosted by Rick Harp.
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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs
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Now displaying: July, 2020
Jul 31, 2020

On this week’s collage of collected, connected conversations (the fourth in our summer series): appropriation and authenticity. The second half of our extended foray into the arts, our topics range from tacky souvenirs to the endless parade of Settlers pining to play Indian, as we question the images of Indigenous people: who gets to make and profit by them, as well as what is and isn’t considered ‘authentic.’ Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta's Department of Drama

• Brock Pitawanakwat, York University Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies

• Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta

• Taté Walker, Lakota activist and communications professional

// CREDITS: This episode was produced and edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. Creative Commons music in this episode includes “Headway,” by Kai Engel, “Startup nation” by Anonymous 420, “On the Run” by ROZKOL, “Dead From The Beginning Alive Till The End,” by Doctor Turtle, Behind Our Efforts, Let There Be Found Our Efforts by LG17, plus “Home Base Groove and “Quasi_Motion” by Kevin Macleod.

Jul 23, 2020

On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the third in our summer series), the arts take centre stage. A stage so wide, it’ll take two acts to cover it all. For our first act, we look at representation and misrepresentation, be it on-screen, on stage, or on the page. From gatekeepers to white fragility, it ain’t easy trying to be Indigenous in this industry.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Cutcha Risling Baldy, Assistant Professor and Department Chair of Native American Studies at Humboldt State University.

• Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism

• Kim TallBear, Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta

• Brock Pitawanakwat, York University Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies

• Ken Williams, University of Alberta Assistant Professor of Drama

• Taté Walker, Lakota activist and communications professional

• Jessica Ka'nhehsí:io Deer, a Kanien'kehá:ka journalist at CBC Indigenous

// CREDITS: This episode was produced and edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. Creative Commons music in this episode includes “Headway,” by Kai Engel, L'Etoile danse (Pt. 1) by Meydän, Jolenta Clears The Table by Doctor Turtle, “New Years Day” by Breath Before the Plunge, “Love” by Steve Combs, and “Lost_Forever” by Little Glass Men.

Jul 15, 2020

In our second summer series collection of connected conversations: a checkup on the state of Indigenous health. A thorough examination of how the Canadian health system can all too often operate against Indigenous well-being via ill-considered policies and practices. Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Mary Jane McCallum, professor of history at University of Winnipeg

• Dr. James Makokis, a Cree physician based in Alberta

• Dr. Lisa Richardson, clinician-educator, University of Toronto division of general internal medicine; joint strategic lead in Indigenous Health, U of T Faculty of Medicine

• Dr. Jason Pennington, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto; Scarborough General Hospital staff surgeon; joint strategic lead in Indigenous Health, U of T Faculty of Medicine

• Colleen Simard, writer/designer/filmmaker

• Conrad Prince, child health and welfare advocate

• Pam Palmater, Chair in Indigenous Governance, Ryerson University’s department of Politics and Public Administration

• Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University

• Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

• Amy Bombay, Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and the School of Nursing at Dalhousie University

• Danika Billie Littlechild, lawyer and international Indigenous rights advocate

• Robert Jago, writer/entrepreneur

// CREDITS: This episode was produced and edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. Creative Commons tracks in this episode include Headway” and “Interception” by Kai Engel, “Isolated” by Kevin MacLeod, “Carnival” and “There are Places” by smallertide, “Comadreamers I” by Haunted Me, “Chalet” by Meydän, plus “A Perceptible Shift” and “A Human Being” by Andy G. Cohen.

Jul 7, 2020

Once again this year, we at MEDIA INDIGENA have dug deep into our archives to bring you a summer-long series of collected, connected conversations, on a variety of topics: from drugs to data, the arts to activism. We begin with a subject some argue has always been at the heart of the Canadian project: genocide. Once dismissed outright as an object of any serious consideration in this country, there is today a compelling case to be made that Canada's past and present actions merit the label of genocide.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

• Ryerson University professor Chris Powell, author of Barbaric Civilizations: A Critical Sociology of Genocide

• Historian James Daschuk, author of Clearing the Plains: Disease, the Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life

• Brock Pitawanakwat, associate professor of Indigenous studies at York University

• Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

• Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC

• Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment

// CREDITS: This episode was produced and edited by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp. Creative Commons music in this episode includes the tracks “Headway,” and “Evermore” by Kai Engel. Other tracks were “A Vital Piece of Music for All Your Soundtrack Needs,” by Steve Combs and “Dark Room,” by XTaKeRuX.

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