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MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program

Weekly current affairs roundtable focusing on Indigenous issues and events. Hosted by Rick Harp.
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MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program
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Now displaying: October, 2016
Oct 29, 2016

This week's Indigenous current affairs roundtable discusses the controversial, much-criticized, Muskrat Falls hydro project in Labrador: has an 11th-hour negotiation addressed the critics' concerns? And the Public Health Agency of Canada has shone a spotlight on the issue of family violence in its annual report, including how it impacts Indigenous families.

Joining us once again on this week’s roundtable are Colleen Simard and Conrad Prince.

 

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 22, 2016

This week on our Indigenous current affairs roundtable: is Alberta all wet when it comes to Indigenous water rights? A recent story in the Globe and Mail suggests the province’s view may be skewed when it comes to whose rights take priority.

Plus, a First Nation in British Columbia says it wants to administer drug tests to all its politicians and employees as a way to combat drug abuse. Will it work?

Joining us once again are Colleen Simard and Conrad Prince.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 15, 2016

This week, our Indigenous current affairs roundtable unpacks recent revelations that, despite federal bureaucrats saying the cupboard for First Nations education funding was full, the Liberals deliberately chose to delay a large chunk of it until after the next election. And, we’ll share our thoughts on an alarming report out of BC that shows First Nations kids in custody suffer alarming rates of sexual abuse. Joining us once again are Colleen Simard and Conrad Prince. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

 

Oct 7, 2016

Ottawa's police force is taking some heat after one of its own appears to have posted racist comments on a local newspaper’s website. The commentary followed a story about the tragic and untimely death of acclaimed Inuk artist Annie Pootoogook. The police are investigating, calling her death "suspicious," but won’t get into specifics. Meanwhile, members of Ottawa's Indigenous community are outraged that a police officer would even publicly comment on the case, much less dismiss the idea that Pootoogook's death deserves to be spoken of in the same breath as the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women. Sitting at the roundtable to discuss this incident, and what it may say about the attitudes of rank and file police, are Colleen Simard and Conrad Prince.

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