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MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program

Weekly current affairs roundtable focusing on Indigenous issues and events. Hosted by Rick Harp.
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MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program
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Now displaying: October, 2018
Oct 28, 2018

This week, part two of our live show at the University of Winnipeg on the potential impacts of cannabis legalization on Indigenous peoples in Canada. Part one featured matters of jurisdiction and justice; this time 'round, we look at the way some dream of an economic jackpot while others foresee a nightmare of mental and moral jeopardy.

Sponsored by the UWSA, the evening featured roundtable regular Kim TallBear (University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies) as well as special guest roundtabler Tim Fontaine of Walking Eagle News and cannabis journalist Solomon Israel of TheLeafNews.com.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Oct 25, 2018

On this week’s program, recorded live in Winnipeg, we stir the pot now that Canada’s cannabis countdown is complete, making it only the second country in the world to legalize marijuana.

But what could this all mean for Indigenous peoples? Some see cannabis as the great green hope, but others aren’t nearly so high on the plant’s prospects for prosperity. In part one of our discussion, we explore matters of jurisdiction and justice with University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies Kim TallBear, special guest Tim Fontaine, Editor-in-Grand-Chief of Walking Eagle News, and cannabis beat reporter Solomon Israel of TheLeafNews.com.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 14, 2018

Twelve years. According to a new report from the UN-backed Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), that's how long we have to act both decisively and radically concerning the climate if we are to keep life viable for much if not most of humanity.

Here's another number: 1.5 degrees Celsius. According to the same IPCC report, that’s the maximum increase in average world temperatures, relative to pre-industrial levels, that our planet can sustain before it will simply be unable to sustain us.

That’s the bad news. But believe it or not, there is good news here too: many say keeping our planet below 1.5 is not only achievable, but realistic, though it will require a scale and scope of change that is simply unprecedented.

This week, visiting professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University Candis Callison, along with Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, join host Rick Harp to grapple with these sobering facts, as well as discuss what’s behind them and where our world ought to go from here.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Oct 7, 2018

This week, our special live-audience episode in Edmonton, where we discussed... Protocol Schmotocol: What one professor’s slide into another’s DMs on Twitter in search of help on a highly-sensitive subject can teach us about ethical research... 'Indigenous Renaissance': Just one of many pointed phrases in the victory speech of Maliseet musician Jeremy Dutcher at this year’s Polaris Music Prize ceremony. But as Indigenous artists continue to rack up recognition in the broader arts world, should we see their success as made-in-Canada, or made despite it? Education 'Indigenization': Confused by what different institutions mean by the term? Special guest Adam Gaudry (Associate Dean and Associate Professor, Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) walks us through what true reconciliation might look like in the academy.

Featuring regulars Rick Harp, Kim TallBear and Ken Williams, it's the first-ever MEDIA INDIGENA roundtable recorded in front of a live audience. Thanks again to our event sponsorthe U of A Faculty of Native Studiesfor making it all possible!

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

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