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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Weekly current affairs roundtable focusing on Indigenous issues and events. Hosted by Rick Harp.
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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs
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Now displaying: August, 2019
Aug 28, 2019

On this week’s collected, connected conversations—the last in our Summer Series—the serious business of self-Indigenization. On its face, Indigenous identity would seem like it would be simple to understand who is and who isn’t First Nations, Inuit or Metis. That is, if you choose to look past the colonial elephant in the room. And yet, complicated and confusing as colonialism can make the identification process, it all comes down to knowing not only who claims which Nation or People—but which People or Nation claims them.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Writer, blogger and educator Cutcha Risling Baldy and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker; Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and writer Terese Mailhot; CBC broadcaster and writer Waubgeshig Rice, and sports business columnist Jason Notte; Ken Williams, assistant professor, University of Alberta Department of Drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University; Adam Gaudry, Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Darryl Leroux, Associate Professor, Social Justice & Community Studies, Saint Mary’s University.

This podcast was edited and produced by Anya Zoledziowski and Rick Harp.

 

CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Kevin MacLeod: "Awkward Meeting," "Upbeat Forever," "Western Streets," "The Show Must Be Go" and "Beauty Flow." It also includes "Heimweh" by Sascha Ende and "Crown" by KuzzzoLearn more about MacLeod and Ende at incompetech.com and filmmusic.ioKuzzzo at Fugue. Our intro music comes courtesy of BenevolentBadger.com

Aug 19, 2019

On this week’s collected, connected conversations (number eight in our Summer Series): comprehending and combating Climate Change. And as our current crisis continues to heat up the planet, it’s also lit a fire under MEDIA INDIGENA. That’s partly because we know that climate change disproportionately impacts Indigenous peoples—despite Indigenous knowledges offering critical clues to how to help combat imminent climate disaster.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Russ Diabo, publisher/editor of the First Nations Strategic Bulletin; Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta; as well as Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama.

This episode was produced and edited by Anya Zoledziowski and Rick Harp. 

CREDITS // Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Sascha Ende: "Mystery Of Dandela (instrumental)," "Flucht (Romeos Erbe)," “Image film 033,” "Chord Guitar 002" and "Dreamsphere 8." We also featured the track "Beauty Flow" by Kevin MacLeod. Hear more of both artists’ work at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. Our intro music comes courtesy of BenevolentBadger.com

Aug 12, 2019

On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the seventh in our Summer Series): the other half of our two-part look at remaking the Indigenous family. Last episode, we got into the colonial principles of Settler family forms and norms. This episode, we lay out how they are applied in practice, with Indigenous people often on the receiving end. And if the expression “What you believe in, you budget” holds true here, it would seem the Canadian state has never been one to believe in either Indigenous children or their families.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance) Sarah de Leeuw, Research Associate with the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health (NCCIH); Kenn Richard, founder and former Executive Director, Native Child and Family Services of Toronto; Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, along with journalist and photographer Wawmeesh Hamilton; Indigenous homelessness researcher Jesse Thistle; and Ken Williams, assistant professor, University of Alberta's department of drama.

This episode was produced and edited by Rick Harp.

CREDITS // Creative Commons music in this episode includes works by Sascha Ende and Kevin MacLeod; learn more about their work at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. We also featured songs by Stanislav Vdovin and Ilya Marfin; hear more by them on Fugue. Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com.

Aug 5, 2019

On this episode’s collected, connected conversations (the sixth in this Summer Series): Part One of “Re-making the Indigenous Family.” Said to be among society’s most sacrosanct institutions, 'The Family' is a core site and source of social reproduction. But is the Settler family form the only way to organize human relations? Does it matter that this dominant, mainstream form differs from those of Indigenous peoples? The answers to these questions are critical, for they are at the heart of why Canada’s child and family welfare systems have failed Indigenous children and families. And yet, as you’ll hear in this episode, what is a failure to some is of benefit to others, on a truly massive scale.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta; Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism; Commentator and entrepreneur Robert Jago plus lawyer and international Indigenous rights advocate Danika Billie Littlechild.

CREDITS // Creative Commons music in this episode includes the track "Beauty Flow" by Kevin MacLeod. Learn more about MacLeod’s work at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io.
Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com

This episode was produced and edited by Rick Harp.

 

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