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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Current affairs roundtable focusing on Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.
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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs
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Now displaying: May, 2022
May 22, 2022

This week, it's another 'MINI' INDIGENA, where we pack in sizzling-hot takes on a flurry of items via social audio. Joining host/producer Rick Harp on Friday, May 20 via the Callin app were MI regulars Ken Williams (assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama) and Trina Roache (Rogers Chair in Journalism at the University of King’s College) as they discussed:

• Might more and more settlers in Australia be finally taking climate change a tad more seriously now that it's made some of their homes effectively uninsurable?

• Did mainstream media really just victim-blame a gunned-down Métis hunter?

• How a Reuters / Globe and Mail article ("Indigenous Canadians [sic] make a painful plea on eve of British royal visit") triggered many of Trina's pet peeves about reportage on Indigenous peoples;

• monthly Patreon podcast supporter Courtney asks: "Should local First Nations hold approval/veto power over urban planning and land use decisions on their traditional territories?"

>> CREDITS: 'Blueprint' by Jahzzar (CC BY-SA 4.0); ‘In Shadows’ by William Ross Chernoff's Nomads (CC-BY); ‘Feeling Like A Delicate Cookie’ by Captive Portal (CC BY-SA 4.0)

May 10, 2022

For our eighth 'MINI' INDIGENA of the season, MI regular Kim TallBear (professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) and special guest January Rogers (Mohawk/Tuscarora poet, author, and media producer from Six Nations of the Grand River) join host/producer Rick Harp via the Callin app to discuss:

i) Jacqueline Keeler’s recent piece, “Striking Down Roe v. Wade Leaves Native Women and Girls Even More Vulnerable”;

ii) why the time may be right for a Mister Indian World competition;

iii) how the pro sports team that brought us the ‘Tomahawk Chop’ took it upon themselves to add their voice to National Missing and Murdered Indigenous Persons Awareness Day;

iv) intersections between forced sterilization and criminalizing abortion

>> CREDITS: 'Microship' by CavalloPazzo (CC BY-SA 4.0)

May 3, 2022

Gift or grift? When it comes to the spoils of colonialism, perhaps none have been more spoiled than the Hudson’s Bay Company. A 17th century creature of empire which drove a global fur trade, HBC would go on to make itself synonymous with Canada, blanketed in the country’s foundational myths. Along the way, exploiting and extracting all it could from Indigenous lands, waters and peoples. These days, such nationalist nostalgia has taken a bit of a hit, it seems; so too, The Bay’s days of department store dominance. Which may help explain the company’s recent embrace of a novel way to launder its reputation: by handing over one of its most iconic buildings to a First Nations organization. But can this present make up for its past? Will this ultimate fixer-upper help renovate the Relationship—or just expose the gargantuan cracks in its foundations?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp to construct an answer to these questions and more are roundtable regular Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, along with special guest Adele Perry, Distinguished Professor of History and the Director of the Centre for Human Rights Research at the University of Manitoba.

// CREDITS: Our opening/closing theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

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