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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Weekly current affairs roundtable focusing on Indigenous issues and events. Hosted by Rick Harp.
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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs
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Now displaying: Page 7
Jan 12, 2020

On this week’s program: awakening ancestral languages. Our very first episode of 2020 sees us return to our partnership with the Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speakers Series, sponsored by the University of Winnipeg’s Office of Indigenous Affairs. This time around, we’ll hear from Dr. Margaret Noodin, Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and director of the Electa Quinney Institute for American Indian Education. She’s also a poet and passionate advocate for Anishnaabemowin language revitalization.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Dec 31, 2019

If you’re active on Twitter maybe you’ve seen it—the fuss some have kicked up over Donald Trump’s recent use of the phrase “Indian Country” in a tweet. But look carefully among those the most fussed: what you won’t find are many, if any, “Indians.” On this week’s Indigenous roundtable, we climb into this cross-cultural chasm of criticism, and discuss why even those ever-vigilant #NativeTwitter types feel there’s way bigger fish to fry.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp for the final show of the decade are Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies.

// CREDITS: ‘nesting’ by birocratic (opening/closing theme); ‘Ukulele Song,’ by Rafael Krux (orchestralis.net)

Dec 26, 2019

Did you know it’s been roughly four years since Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission issued its final report? If all you follow is mainstream media, likely not: which is odd, because the work of the TRC very much remains open in the form of its 94 Calls to Actionfew of which are anywhere near complete.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp to share their assessment of where Canada stands on those Calls are Ryerson University's Eva Jewell (Assistant Professor of Sociology) and Ian Mosby (Assistant Professor of History). An assessment recently published by the Yellowhead Institute in its brief, “Calls To Action Accountability: A Status Update On Reconciliation.”

CREDITS: Opening/closing theme is 'nesting,' by birocratic; interstitial is 'Holiday Gift' by Kai Engel (CC BY 4.0).

Dec 24, 2019

On this week’s Indigenous roundtable: Taking control, taking stock. How a First Nation in Ontario decided the only way they’re going to find images of Indigenous people that don’t rely on stereotypes is to make their own catalogue of stock photography.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp to discuss how literally owning your own depictions is key to cultural self-determination are Kim TallBear (University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies) and Candis Callison (Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism).

CREDITS: This episode of the podcast was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; hosted and produced by Rick Harp. Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Dec 15, 2019

THIS WEEK: The Bureaucrats’ Burden. Could there be any job tougher than running Indian Affairs? Sources at Indian Affairs say “No!” According to a recent Global News story, senior officials at Indigenous Services Canada wish Canadians better understood all the great work they do, something they say has been "difficult" to communicate "effectively" thanks to obstacles like... Twitter bots?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week to discuss this departmentaI dismay (and diagnosis) are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University Brock Pitawanakwat.

CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic; SFX: Robot;  Broken Telephone Circuit

Nov 29, 2019

This week: Bringing blood home. Over a half-century after their removal, a large cluster of blood samples from Indigenous islanders in Australia have been returned to whence they came. The result of direct negotiations with the affected community, the move has been held up as historic for the country. But if Australia’s on the bleeding edge of repatriation, what about the rest of the world? From skin to saliva, blood to bones, do we even know how much Indigenous material has been banked across the globe? And should we put repatriation under the banner of reconciliation?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp to take the pulse of these and other questions are University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies Kim TallBear, as well as Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 25, 2019

“What was CBC North management thinking?” A question fresh on the mind of CBC audiences and CBC staff this week, shocked and dismayed at the decision to combine three territorial morning newscasts into one. A decision that proved short-lived, however: even before the ink was dry, CBC brass buckled under the backlash and reversed course.

In this discussion, host/producer Rick Harp is joined by Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, as well as Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism as they try to parse out the ‘logic’ behind the move, what it tells us about how well CBC gets the north, as well as what it would take—and who—to make things right going forward.

// CREDITS: This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Nov 18, 2019

This week, class dismissedor should we say class denied? A North Carolina advisory board has rejected a proposed Native charter school on the grounds its curriculum would be too radical. Of course, that’s all in the eyes of the beholder, but with funding all in the hands of the state, could this be a textbook case of education discrimination? And nearly a half century after the 1970s rallying cry “Indian Control of Indian Education,” how close is anyone to realizing that vision?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp on the roundtable this week are Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the department of drama at the University of Alberta, and U of A associate professor of Native Studies Kim TallBear.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 11, 2019

It’s a dilemma that confronts much of Indigenous media: with so much of our time spent working to counter, correct and contextualize mainstream misinformation, do we not risk becoming “This Week in Settler Colonialism”? Does routinely responding to routine violations of our lands and lives see us become all-consumed by what the State does and doesn’t do? How do we resist that pull of a Settler center of gravity, and stop merely critiquing, and start actually creating outside of its orbit?

Questions on our minds a lot these days as we begin a conversation on where else we might invest our attention and intentions, to build on our original mission as an Indigenous reality check on the misrepresentations of Settler-oriented media.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week are Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University.

CREDITS: This episode of the podcast was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; hosted and produced by Rick Harp. Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Oct 30, 2019
This week, the back half of our post-Canadian-election post-mortem, featuring the Yellowhead Institute’s Hayden King and Vanessa Watts. In part one of our discussion, we compared the relative prominence of so-called Indigenous issues this election versus the one before. Here in part two, we more concretely explore the likely machinations of a minority Parliament and how Indigenous interests might shake out. We also go deeper into Indigenous electoral participation: be it as voters or vote-getters, is it worth the return on investment?
 
CREDITS // This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; hosted and produced by Rick Harp. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.
Oct 25, 2019

Barely 3 days after the Liberals' return to power -- only this time, as a minority government -- we wonder what that could mean for Indigenous peoples going forward. Did Indigenous issues make a difference this election? Did Indigenous voters?

Joining us this week to tackle these questions and more are two members of the Yellowhead Institute, a First Nation-led research centre based in the Faculty of Arts at Ryerson University: Executive Director Hayden King as well as Research Fellow Vanessa Watts. 

CREDITS: This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; produced and hosted by Rick Harp. Special thanks to our friends at the Ryerson School of Journalism, whose support made this live event possible. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 14, 2019

It's been quite the week for the bottom-line of Canadian colonialism. First, a blunt assessment of what the lives of First Nations' kids are worth as the Liberals push to quash compensation for damage done by the child welfare system. Then, as part of an election scrum, a reporter casually suggests that covering the cost of access to safe, clean drinking water on-reserve amounts to writing a "blank cheque."

So how is it that resolving a basic necessity and a fundamental inequity can both be framed as, if not implausible, at least impractical for a so-called developed economy? What do we make of a mainstream mindset that bristles at the cost of making either of these situations right? And under such a colonial calculus, is it any wonder who ultimately pays the price? Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week to crunch the numbers are Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

CREDITS // This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 8, 2019

This week, grousing over Greta. Even though millions recently took to the streets as part of world-wide Climate Strikes, the media still seems to reserve most of its spotlight for the teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg. And yet, not everyone’s a fan: from Maxime Bernier to Vladimir Putin, she seems to irk white cis male politicians in particular. But the idolatry of Thunberg has also received pushback from parts of Native Twitter, frustrated at how she seemingly gets all the accolades while Indigenous youth and youth of colour toil in relative obscurity.

On this week's live-audience edition of MEDIA INDIGENArecorded in Edmonton as part of LitFest's 'Author Pods' event serieswe get into these Greta grumbles as a springboard into a larger discussion about allyship, white saviourism and the pros and cons of personifying and celebrifying a people’s movement.

On stage with host/producer Rick Harp were Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the department of drama at the University of Alberta, and U of A associate professor of Native Studies, Kim TallBear.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 29, 2019
This week: taking the measure of data about Indigenous peoples. It's a bit of a departure from our usual roundtable formatthe first of our live audience discussions connected to the annual Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speakers Series, sponsored by the University of Winnipeg’s Office of Indigenous Affairs. Starting us off is Dr. Jennifer Walker, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Health at Laurentian University and Scientist and Indigenous Lead with IC/ES North.
 
 
// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.
Sep 18, 2019

Who’da thunk it? For once, we at MEDIA INDIGENA are happy to be wrong—right out of the gate at the first leaders debate, Indigenous issues are on the radar of Canada’s federal election. But will they continue to enjoy that spotlight? And among those leaders who did take part in that first to-and-fro, who got it right and who got it left when it comes to 'Indigenous affairs'? Sharing their thoughts this week with host/producer Rick Harp are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

CREDITS:

Phone hangup SFX: https://freesound.org/s/189727/

Music: 'Cup of Wine,' by Ilya Truhanov from Fugue; 'nesting' by birocratic

Sep 15, 2019

This week: the not-so-amazing race to form Canada's next government! That’s right: it's federal election time from now until October 21. But will Indigenous interests factor much if at all into this election? We discuss the recent efforts by the Assembly of First Nations to make sure that happens. Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable are Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama. 


// CREDITS: Music: 'nesting' by birocratic (theme), 'Cup of Wine' by Ilya Truhanov from Fugue. Phone hangup SFX: https://freesound.org/s/189727/

Sep 8, 2019

From the second it hit social media, the new ad campaign for the House of Dior’s so-called 'Sauvage' cologne kicked up a stink. In fact, as soon as Native Twitter got wind of the new video—starring the notorious Johnny Depp—the blowback was fast, furious and less than fragrant. In our return to all-new episodes, we try to make 'scents' of why Indian Country’s collective nose is so out of joint.

Back at the roundtable are Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism and Kim TallBear, Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Aug 28, 2019

On this week’s collected, connected conversations—the last in our Summer Series—the serious business of self-Indigenization. On its face, Indigenous identity would seem like it would be simple to understand who is and who isn’t First Nations, Inuit or Metis. That is, if you choose to look past the colonial elephant in the room. And yet, complicated and confusing as colonialism can make the identification process, it all comes down to knowing not only who claims which Nation or People—but which People or Nation claims them.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Writer, blogger and educator Cutcha Risling Baldy and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker; Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and writer Terese Mailhot; CBC broadcaster and writer Waubgeshig Rice, and sports business columnist Jason Notte; Ken Williams, assistant professor, University of Alberta Department of Drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University; Adam Gaudry, Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Darryl Leroux, Associate Professor, Social Justice & Community Studies, Saint Mary’s University.

This podcast was edited and produced by Anya Zoledziowski and Rick Harp.

 

CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Kevin MacLeod: "Awkward Meeting," "Upbeat Forever," "Western Streets," "The Show Must Be Go" and "Beauty Flow." It also includes "Heimweh" by Sascha Ende and "Crown" by KuzzzoLearn more about MacLeod and Ende at incompetech.com and filmmusic.ioKuzzzo at Fugue. Our intro music comes courtesy of BenevolentBadger.com

Aug 19, 2019

On this week’s collected, connected conversations (number eight in our Summer Series): comprehending and combating Climate Change. And as our current crisis continues to heat up the planet, it’s also lit a fire under MEDIA INDIGENA. That’s partly because we know that climate change disproportionately impacts Indigenous peoples—despite Indigenous knowledges offering critical clues to how to help combat imminent climate disaster.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Russ Diabo, publisher/editor of the First Nations Strategic Bulletin; Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta; as well as Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama.

This episode was produced and edited by Anya Zoledziowski and Rick Harp. 

CREDITS // Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Sascha Ende: "Mystery Of Dandela (instrumental)," "Flucht (Romeos Erbe)," “Image film 033,” "Chord Guitar 002" and "Dreamsphere 8." We also featured the track "Beauty Flow" by Kevin MacLeod. Hear more of both artists’ work at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. Our intro music comes courtesy of BenevolentBadger.com

Aug 12, 2019

On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the seventh in our Summer Series): the other half of our two-part look at remaking the Indigenous family. Last episode, we got into the colonial principles of Settler family forms and norms. This episode, we lay out how they are applied in practice, with Indigenous people often on the receiving end. And if the expression “What you believe in, you budget” holds true here, it would seem the Canadian state has never been one to believe in either Indigenous children or their families.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance) Sarah de Leeuw, Research Associate with the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health (NCCIH); Kenn Richard, founder and former Executive Director, Native Child and Family Services of Toronto; Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, along with journalist and photographer Wawmeesh Hamilton; Indigenous homelessness researcher Jesse Thistle; and Ken Williams, assistant professor, University of Alberta's department of drama.

This episode was produced and edited by Rick Harp.

CREDITS // Creative Commons music in this episode includes works by Sascha Ende and Kevin MacLeod; learn more about their work at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. We also featured songs by Stanislav Vdovin and Ilya Marfin; hear more by them on Fugue. Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com.

Aug 5, 2019

On this episode’s collected, connected conversations (the sixth in this Summer Series): Part One of “Re-making the Indigenous Family.” Said to be among society’s most sacrosanct institutions, 'The Family' is a core site and source of social reproduction. But is the Settler family form the only way to organize human relations? Does it matter that this dominant, mainstream form differs from those of Indigenous peoples? The answers to these questions are critical, for they are at the heart of why Canada’s child and family welfare systems have failed Indigenous children and families. And yet, as you’ll hear in this episode, what is a failure to some is of benefit to others, on a truly massive scale.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta; Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism; Commentator and entrepreneur Robert Jago plus lawyer and international Indigenous rights advocate Danika Billie Littlechild.

CREDITS // Creative Commons music in this episode includes the track "Beauty Flow" by Kevin MacLeod. Learn more about MacLeod’s work at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io.
Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com

This episode was produced and edited by Rick Harp.

 

Jul 28, 2019

On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the fifth of our summertime shows): how core concepts of Christianity continue to inspire and infuse the laws, attitudes and actions of supposedly secular Settler states toward Indigenous peoples.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism; Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s Department of Drama and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University; Lakota activist and communications professional Taté Walker.

This podcast was edited and produced by Anya Zoledziowski and Rick Harp. 

CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Kevin MacLeod: "Rising", "Mirage", "Space 1990," "Agnus Dei X", "Comfortable Mystery 2", "Dirt Rhodes", and "Beauty Flow." Learn more about the artist at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com.

Jul 21, 2019

On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the fourth in our Summer Series shows): reckoning with Reconciliation.

But what is 'Reconciliation'? How should it happen? Questions that arise time and time again on our podcast. Questions that are essential to confront for any Settler colonial state like Canada—or at least would be if Canada was serious about moving away from a foundation built upon Indigenous dispossession, disjuncture and dislocation.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Anishinaabe comedian, writer, media maker & community activator Ryan McMahon; Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s Department of Drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University; Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism; and writer/educator Hayden King.

CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Kevin MacLeod: "White Lotus," "Thinking Music," "Celebration," "The Way Out," "Private Reflection," "Unanswered Questions," and "Beauty Flow." Learn more about the artist at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com.

This episode was edited and produced by Rick Harp.

Jul 13, 2019

On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the third in our Summer Series), we head to the lab to put Science under the microscope. From archaeology to genetics to the ethics of biological research, Indigenous people are commonly subjects of study. Studies that often get us wrong or worse, just flat-out deny the worth of our own forms of inquiry and knowledge.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism; plus, Lakota activist and communications professional Taté Walker.

CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Kevin MacLeod: "Magic Scout Cottages", "On the Ground", “With a Creation,” and "Beauty Flow." Learn more about the artist at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com.

This episode was edited and produced by Rick Harp.

Jul 5, 2019

This week’s collected, connected conversations, the second in our Summer Series, feature a focus on the media. From blatant double-standards, to persistent narratives of First Nations ‘failure,’ to victim-blaming, Canadian media has long misrepresented Indigenous peoples, which is why we've so often reported on the reporters.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism; Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s Department of Drama and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University; Michael Redhead Champagne, community organizer; author and journalist Waubgeshig Rice and writer/educator Hayden King.

This episode was edited and produced by Rick Harp.

CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Kevin MacLeod: "New Direction" "Heartbreaking," “Crowd Hammer,” "Come Play with Me", "Amazing Plan: Distressed", and "Beauty Flow." Learn more about the artist at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com

 

 

Jun 27, 2019

Given how all of our Summer Series shows dig deep into our archives, perhaps it’s only fitting that our first episode of the season explores history and heroes. Although, as you’ll hear, what constitutes the latter is certainly in the eye of the beholder.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Kisha Supernant, anthropological archaeologist and associate professor at the University of Alberta; Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s Department of Drama and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University; Lakota activist and communications professional Taté Walker and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta; Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. 

This episode was edited and produced by Rick Harp.

CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Kevin MacLeod: "Wholesome," "Inspired," "Fluidscape" and "Beauty Flow" as well as "Sleepers" by Sascha Ende. Learn more about both artists at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. Our intro music comes courtesy of Benevolent Badger.

Jun 15, 2019

THIS WEEK: Vetting the V-word. 'Victims' and 'victimhood'—it's controversial conceptual territory for many, and depending on your vantage point, distressing for different reasons.

In this, our third and final look at reactions stirred up by the report of the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, we get into when the word works for us or potentially works against us, a larger conversation prompted in part by this comment from Manitoba NDP leader Wab Kinew: "I have no interest in my sons seeing themselves as the victims or survivors of genocide."

// This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 12, 2019

What’s in a word? Well, when that word is "genocide" and you’re part of Canada’s mostly-white, mostly-male commentariat, nothing, apparently. And if you’re like the Prime Minister, the word supposedly matters much less than the vague actions we should focus on going forward.

In part two of our extended look at the report of the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, we examine the steaming pile of hot takes that have come in its wake, including those of Settler media makers who've been at great pains to declare that 'Canadian genocide' is just not a thing, and that using the G word somehow threatens Canada's international reputation.

// This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

 

 

Jun 4, 2019

This episode, we discuss reaction to the final report of Canada's National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. This week marks the official release of that report, just days after details of a leaked copy were circulated by the media.

But did publishing that "unauthorized document" compromise the core messages of the report? More importantly, did it risk further traumatizing families and friends of the murdered and missing?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp to discuss these questions and more are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 29, 2019

This week: State of Alienation. It was a country that didn’t even exist 120 years ago. Yet, today, authorities in Australia are convinced they’re somehow justified in declaring certain Indigenous people to be illegal 'aliens,' individuals the state feels it has the right to kick off the continent despite their connection to cultures which have occupied that continent for tens of thousands of years.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp back at the roundtable this week are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 17, 2019

THIS WEEK: Raising (and removing) red flags in Saskatchewan. A small Prairie village suddenly finds itself at the centre of a storm after one of its residents publicly displays flags long associated with hate. Now a First Nations man is being investigated by police after taking it upon himself to take down those symbols.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp back at the roundtable this week are Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 14, 2019

THIS WEEK: Earth’s bio-diversity death spiralcan we change course? A new United Nations study paints a dark picture of the future, a future pretty much guaranteed if we as a planet continue to follow a path of economic, political and ecological auto-asphyxiation. We discuss why some feel our greatest hope lies in the collective example set by many Indigenous peoples.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 6, 2019

This week: How a lake in the States lost its Indigenous name, re-gained it, only to potentially lose it again because of a Minnesota court decision. Join us as we dive into the details of the Dakota waters known as Bde Maka Ska (aka Lake Calhoun). Sitting with host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// // This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 26, 2019

Picking up where last week’s round table left off, this week is the second half of our deep dive into the dark response to the Notre Dame Cathedral fire, as we explore whether the spiritual schism triggered by its destruction might actually contain ingredients of a “teachable moment” for non-Indigenous people.

Back with host/producer Rick Harp at the round table are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

Links referenced these past two episodes:

// This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 23, 2019

This week: the Indigenous 'grief gap' over Notre Dame. We'll react to the reaction that flooded social media over footage of the fire that ripped through France's Notre Dame cathedral. What do we make of the apparent lack of sympathy displayed by some Indigenous meme-makers and their fans?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp back at the roundtable this week are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 14, 2019

This week: Sonic sovereignty? With Inuit widely credited as creators of a distinctive form of throat-singing, does it follow that they alone should get to perform it? We’ll discuss the increasingly vocal fallout over the fact that a Cree throat-singer is up for an Indigenous Music Award.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable once again are Brock Pitawanakwat, associate professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 8, 2019

This week: Crashing the Liberal party. After an advocate interrupts a recent partisan fundraiser to implore Canada’s prime minister to do right by a First Nation ravaged by industrial pollution, Justin Trudeau thought it'd be funny to thank her for her 'donation' as security escorted her out. Caught on video, the glib comment hit a nerve on social media, prompting some to wonder if it could cost Liberals at the ballot box this fall, thereby prompting retaliation by Liberal supporters in turn.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp once again at the roundtable this week are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 1, 2019

What happens when you reverse the lens and try to unpack what it means to be a Settler? What’s the difference between Settler colonialism and white supremacy—is it one of kind or degree? And can we ever hope to solve “The Settler Problem”?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, Brock Pitawanakwat, and Chris Powell, Associate Professor of Sociology at Ryerson University and the author of Barbaric Civilization: A Critical Sociology of Genocide.

// This episode edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 25, 2019

It's being called a reconciliatory move: a new Liberal budget forgiving interest charges on loans taken out by First Nations to cover the costs of treaty negotiations in British Columbia. But just how grateful should anyone be to a country that imposed such loans in the first place?

Back at the roundtable with host/producer Rick Harp this week are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 19, 2019

This week, another stolen generation, another class action. Three billion dollars, thousands upon thousands of children. These are the stakes of a potential class action alleging the federal government knowingly and "systematically" underfunded child and family services on-reserve, a neglect that's led to the widespread removal of First Nations children from their homes. Negligence that now has legal teams seeking compensation on behalf of those who've suffered the consequences.

 

Back with host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable are Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama.

// This episode edited by Anya Zoledziowski; our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic. 

 

Mar 11, 2019

On this week’s Indigenous roundtable: high-tech treaty rights. According to Māori in New Zealand, their treaty rights don’t just extend to resources of the land and sea, they also include a fair share of the radio spectrum known as 3G, 4G and (soon) 5G, that set of telecommunication frequencies our wireless devices depend on. But the reception from the Settler state so far has been anything but great.

Joining host/producer at the roundtable this week are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic. This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski.

Mar 3, 2019

THIS WEEK: A headdress head scratcher. What exactly did the premier of Albertaa province hell-bent on hydrocarbon exploitation, come what maydo to deserve the honour of a Blackfoot headdress? Then again, could it be that, as non-Blackfoot, it’s none of our goddam business? So what do we make of those Blackfoot who do seem to hate the idea?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable this time: Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// This episode was edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 23, 2019

This week, a battle over boundaries in the state of Utah. We discuss the simmering split in San Juan County, where a majority Indigenous population now has an Indigenous majority representing it on the region’s top decision making body. And while some celebrate this new democratic era for the county, others agitate for its division.

Back at the roundtable this week are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme music is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 15, 2019

Back from our brief hiatus, this week's show speaks frankly about why the Liberal government's proposed Indigenous Languages Act is mostly notable for what it doesn't say. Joining us this week is special return guest Lorena Fontaine, Indigenous academic lead and associate professor of Indigenous Studies at the University of Winnipeg.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 14, 2019

This week... Another BC battlefront: Why Wet'suwet'en resistance to the Coastal Gas Link pipeline project is—and isn’t—so complicated to understand. Revitalizing MEDIA INDIGENA: Why us taking a break after 147 consecutive weeks is the best guarantee of many more episodes to come. Learn more on our website.

Joining us for this special episode—recorded as a livestream with our supporters on Patreon—are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University, Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the U of A’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Dec 30, 2018

This week, the second installment in our two-part conversation with Darrel McLeod, author of Mamaskatch: A Cree Coming of Age.

Winner of the 2018 Governor-General’s award for non-fiction, Mamaskatch has been lauded for its raw, revealing portrait of McLeod’s early years. Covering just over three decades, the book’s proven inspiring to many who have faced similar hardships. That includes host Rick Harp's mother, Jane Glennon, who once again joins in on the discussion.

Last time out, we delved into Darrel’s rocky relationship with his mother, his gender fluidity and the special role birds have occupied throughout his life. This time round, we begin with a discussion of Darrel's arc as a writer, his up and down experiences with education, his resolve to share the truth come what may, and how Darrel struggled at times with his Cree identity.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Dec 24, 2018

This week, we present part one of our two-part conversation with Darrel McLeod, whose memoir recently won this year's Governor-General’s award for non-fiction.

Also joining host/producer Rick Harp for this special edition of the roundtable: Rick's mom, Jane Glennon (née McCallum).

According to the jury that awarded McLeod the $25,000 prize, "MAMASKATCH: A Cree Coming of Age dares to immerse readers in provocative contemporary issues including gender fluidity, familial violence, and transcultural hybridity. A fast-moving, intimate memoir of dreams and nightmares—[it is] lyrical and gritty, raw and vulnerable, told without pity, but with phoenix-like strength."

Earlier this month, we three Cree sat in Sooke, BC together to reflect on Darrel's life stories, their often tumultuous trajectory, and what eventually brought them into being on the printed page.

Dec 15, 2018

Policing the police: A new review of Thunder Bay law enforcement finds the quality of their investigations so flawed many need to be re-opened; Fighting fakery: How a BC media outlet is trying to tackle inauthentic 'Indigenous' art; Off track: Why is Mexico’s new president pushing for a railroad no one seems to want, least of all indigenous peoples whose lands would be threatened by it?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable once again are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Note: The 'Horn Honk' sound effect (by Mike Koenig) featured in this episode appears under a CC 3.0 license.

Dec 9, 2018

This week, we share two presentations delivered on day two of the International Symposium on Indigenous Communities and Climate Change, hosted this December 6th and 7th by Princeton University in New Jersey.

Part of a line-up featuring nine speakers in all, we share talks by MEDIA INDIGENA roundtablers Candis Callison (“Communal Lives and Climate Change: Convening spaces for Indigenous publics, narratives, and knowledge”) and Rick Harp (”Indigenous Independents: Navigating the Challenges of Indie Media Making”).

For more on the event, visit https://www.princetonisiccc.com/schedule

Dec 1, 2018

1. How to deal with denial? Can links be drawn between minimizing the intent and impacts of residential schools of the not-so-distant past with the contemporary practice of forced/coerced sterilization of Indigenous women in Canada? A question top of mind this week for roundtabler Ken Williams as he contemplates the implications of the story of a Canadian imprisoned in Germany for Holocaust denial. Does arguably comparable commentary regarding anti-Indigenous atrocities in Canada merit the same 'nip it in the bud' approach? 2. Murder of a missionary: An American met his end after trying to convert an isolated tribe in India. But if you’re looking for sympathy from Indigenous pockets of social media, best look elsewhere.

Back at the roundtable with host/producer Rick Harp this week are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Nov 24, 2018

1. Fighting fire with fire? Why some say the massive blazes ripping across parts of California did not have to be so furious or fatal, if only the state would listen more to Indigenous peoples. 2. Cultural linchpin or not-so-scenic buzzkill? Why some Ontario cottagers ain’t so 'wild' about the return of rice to the region. 3. Media muzzle? A southern U.S. tribe suddenly takes back the press protections it had only put in place three years prior.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is ‘nesting’ by birocratic.

Nov 16, 2018

1. Child and family fraud? How a potential class action lawsuit against one B.C. social worker has exposed some gaping vulnerabilities in a system supposedly set up to care for kids. 2. Lodging complaints: What the mainstream media missed in its coverage of how a convicted child-killer ended up at an Indigenous-based correctional facility (though she's been subsequently removed). 3. Libellous or frivolous? An Alberta First Nation launches a million dollar lawsuit against one of its own over comments she posted to Facebook.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable once again are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 11, 2018

THIS WEEK... What’s in a name? Everything, for Indigenous families hoping to reclaim their people's traditional naming practices. What gives with philanthropy? The author of a new book on the subject says it’s time to decolonize the sector. Grief over Greyhound: What will First Nations who once relied on the bus service do now that it's ceased operations in western Canada?

Host/producer Rick Harp is joined once again by Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 4, 2018
 

This week... The Will of Brazil: Indigenous advocates raise huge red flags over the election of super right wing president Jair Bolsonaro. Duty Delayed: The Supreme Court rules that Canada does not owe a duty to consult First Nations in the creation of any laws affecting them. Pre-school prevention: What would be so wrong with a new daycare aimed at Indigenous kids? Ask a certain group of property owners in Saskatoon.

Joining host Rick Harp once again are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 28, 2018

This week, part two of our live show at the University of Winnipeg on the potential impacts of cannabis legalization on Indigenous peoples in Canada. Part one featured matters of jurisdiction and justice; this time 'round, we look at the way some dream of an economic jackpot while others foresee a nightmare of mental and moral jeopardy.

Sponsored by the UWSA, the evening featured roundtable regular Kim TallBear (University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies) as well as special guest roundtabler Tim Fontaine of Walking Eagle News and cannabis journalist Solomon Israel of TheLeafNews.com.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Oct 25, 2018

On this week’s program, recorded live in Winnipeg, we stir the pot now that Canada’s cannabis countdown is complete, making it only the second country in the world to legalize marijuana.

But what could this all mean for Indigenous peoples? Some see cannabis as the great green hope, but others aren’t nearly so high on the plant’s prospects for prosperity. In part one of our discussion, we explore matters of jurisdiction and justice with University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies Kim TallBear, special guest Tim Fontaine, Editor-in-Grand-Chief of Walking Eagle News, and cannabis beat reporter Solomon Israel of TheLeafNews.com.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 14, 2018

Twelve years. According to a new report from the UN-backed Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), that's how long we have to act both decisively and radically concerning the climate if we are to keep life viable for much if not most of humanity.

Here's another number: 1.5 degrees Celsius. According to the same IPCC report, that’s the maximum increase in average world temperatures, relative to pre-industrial levels, that our planet can sustain before it will simply be unable to sustain us.

That’s the bad news. But believe it or not, there is good news here too: many say keeping our planet below 1.5 is not only achievable, but realistic, though it will require a scale and scope of change that is simply unprecedented.

This week, visiting professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University Candis Callison, along with Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, join host Rick Harp to grapple with these sobering facts, as well as discuss what’s behind them and where our world ought to go from here.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Oct 7, 2018

This week, our special live-audience episode in Edmonton, where we discussed... Protocol Schmotocol: What one professor’s slide into another’s DMs on Twitter in search of help on a highly-sensitive subject can teach us about ethical research... 'Indigenous Renaissance': Just one of many pointed phrases in the victory speech of Maliseet musician Jeremy Dutcher at this year’s Polaris Music Prize ceremony. But as Indigenous artists continue to rack up recognition in the broader arts world, should we see their success as made-in-Canada, or made despite it? Education 'Indigenization': Confused by what different institutions mean by the term? Special guest Adam Gaudry (Associate Dean and Associate Professor, Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) walks us through what true reconciliation might look like in the academy.

Featuring regulars Rick Harp, Kim TallBear and Ken Williams, it's the first-ever MEDIA INDIGENA roundtable recorded in front of a live audience. Thanks again to our event sponsorthe U of A Faculty of Native Studiesfor making it all possible!

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 30, 2018

This week we bring you 'part two' of last week's round table, one that ran unusually long because of our extended discussion about APTN’s controversial reality show, "First Contact." Those outstanding two topics are... Prime directive: A leaked video seems to show Canada’s PM scolding First Nations leaders for their time 'mismanagement'; plus, Settler solidaritywhat might it really look like? Two examples from the Antipodes could show the way.

Still seated at the round table: Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Candis Callison, visiting professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 20, 2018

Provocative or problematic? We discuss why opinion is sharply divided over 'First Contact,' a new APTN mini-series showcasing Canadians’ deep ignorance about Aboriginal peoples. And, with our discussion going so in-depth and protracted, we eat up the time normally devoted to three topics!

Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Candis Callison, visiting professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University (on leave from UBC).

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Sep 14, 2018

1. 'Sinful' ceremony: a Cree community finds itself at spiritual odds over whether to allow a pow-wow some regard as blasphemous. // 2. Must the show go on? Robert Lepage's first attempt to tell "the story of Canada through the prism of [white-Indigenous] relations”minus a single Indigenous actorgot cancelled. Now it appears the famous Quebec playwright will get to stage the show after all. // 3. Boyden’s back, and there’s gonna be trouble! Why a movie adapted from a controversial author’s work has made some uneasy in their seats.

Back at the roundtable are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta's Department of Drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Sep 8, 2018

Is a controversial pipeline now a pipe-dream? Canada’s Federal Court of Appeal has just ruled that plans to expand the Trans Mountain pipeline are to be put on hold until the government gets its act together on the potential impacts of greater oil tanker traffic on marine ecosystems and on its failure to meaningfully consult Indigenous peoples.

But is this ruling a slam dunk? What’s to be made of the heated, even hysterical, reaction from some quarters? And where could or should things go from here?

Back at this all-new roundtable this week are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, visiting professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University (on leave from UBC).

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Sep 4, 2018

1. Man camp controversy: decades-old abuse allegations against hydro-dam workers finally surface in Manitoba. Might it spark a flood of similar complaints? 2. Stat spat: talk of a new federal holiday commemorating the survivors of residential schools gets mixed reviews 3. Mac attack: why the reputation of John A. Macdonald (Canada’s first prime minister) is getting taken off its pedestalliterally.

Back at the roundtable are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury.

// Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Aug 24, 2018

Our ninth and final episode of our Summer Series collects and connects conversations about pipelines, in particular, the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project. Featured voices in this episode include (in order of appearance): Indigenous Resource lawyer Merle Alexander; Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism; Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

This 9-week series was hosted and co-produced by Rick Harp, with editorial and production assistance by Stephanie Wood.

Creative Commons music this podcast includes the track 'Endeavour' by Jahzzar. Learn more at freemusicarchive.org.

Aug 17, 2018

On this week's episode, the second-last show in our Summer Series, we revisit the troubling death of Colten Boushie—the 22-year old member of the Red Pheasant First Nation shot and killed back in August of 2016 by a then-54-year-old white farmer named Gerald Stanley. Featured voices this episode include (in order of appearance): Documentarian and University of Saskatchewan assistant professor of English, Tasha Hubbard, as well as Chris Andersen, then-interim dean at the University of Alberta’s faculty of Native Studies; Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama, and, Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury.

Music this podcast includes two compositions by Welcome Wizard off their lunachild album: we heard the tracks “12 Diseases” and “Nautical Fistula.” We also heard the track “Endeavour” by Jahzzar. Learn more about these artists at freemusicarchive.org

Aug 10, 2018

Our seventh Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about Thunder Bay, a small northwestern Ontario city where a huge amount of hostility has been directed at Indigenous people. It’s a negativity so persistent and pervasive, it is seemingly ingrained across a variety of the region’s institutions. Featured voices in this podcast include: CBC journalist Jody Porter; Karyn Pugliese, Executive Director of News and Current Affairs with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, plus Lisa Girbav, a radio broadcaster from Tsimshian territory and a student at UBC; University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies Kim TallBear, along with associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism Candis Callison; Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama; Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury.

Creative Commons music in this podcast includes the song “Endeavour” by Jahzzar. Learn more at freemusicarchive.org

Aug 3, 2018

Our sixth Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about language: more specifically, the politics of Indigenous language rights and funding in Canada. Featured voices this episode include: Lorena Fontaine, an associate professor of Indigenous Governance at the University of Winnipeg; Karyn Pugliese, APTN's Executive Director of News and Current Affairs, along with Lisa Girbav, radio broadcaster and student from the Tsimshian territory; Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, plus Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

Creative Commons music in this podcast includes the song 'Endeavour' by Jahzzar. Learn more at freemusicarchive.org

Jul 27, 2018

This week's episode, the fifth in our Summer Series, wraps up our two-part conversation with the Yellowhead Institute's Hayden King and Shiri Pasternak about their critique of the Trudeau government's Indigenous Rights, Recognition and Implementation Framework, a comprehensive set of laws and policies that, if implemented, could fundamentally change the course of Indigenous rights in Canada.

Creative Commons music in this podcast includes the song 'Endeavour' by Jahzzar. Find our more at freemusicarchive.org.

Jul 20, 2018

The fourth show of our Summer Series begins our two-part look at an emerging set of proposed laws and policies that, if implemented, could majorly affectsome say threatenIndigenous rights in Canada. It's called the Indigenous Rights, Recognition and Implementation Framework, a wide-ranging, fast-moving initiative of the Trudeau government.

In these next two episodes, Hayden King and Shiri Pasternak of the Yellowhead Institute share their concerns with the Framework as detailed in their special report, Canada’s Emerging Indigenous Rights Framework: A Critical Analysis.

Creative Commons music in this podcast includes the song 'Endeavour' by Jahzzar. Find out more at freemusicarchive.org.

Jul 13, 2018

Our third Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about food: it’s a veritable buffet of some of our most filling discussions, from access to traditional foods to culture clashes over Settler vs. Indigenous diets. Featured voices this podcast include Iqaluit, Nunavut mayor Madeleine Redfern; Kim Tallbear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta; Lakota activist and communications professional Taté Walker; and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.


Creative Commons music in this podcast includes the track 'Endeavour,' by Jahzzar. Learn more at http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jahzzar/

Jul 6, 2018

Our second Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about education: from inadequate funding to lack of Indigenous representation in many school curricula, we explore systemic issues and the lived experience of some Indigenous learners in this realm.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, along with journalist and entrepreneur Patrice Mousseau; Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury; APTN News & Current Affairs director Karyn Pugliese; Entrepreneur and commentator Robert Jago and lawyer and international advocate Danika Billie Littlechild; Kim Tallbear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker; Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism

Creative Commons music in this podcast includes the track 'Endeavour,' by Jahzzar. Learn more at http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jahzzar/

Jul 1, 2018

For the first episode in our MEDIA INDIGENA: the Summer Edition series, we take a deep dive into water, from its status as a fundamental human and treaty right, to more nitty-gritty matters of funding, infrastructure and accountability.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Amanda Klasing, senior researcher with Human Rights Watch; writer/designer/filmmaker Colleen Simard plus child health and welfare advocate Conrad Prince; entrepreneur and commentator Robert Jago, along with lawyer and advocate Danika Billie Littlechild.

This episode was edited and produced by Stephanie Wood and Rick Harp.

Creative Commons music in this podcast includes the track 'Endeavour,' by Jahzzar. Learn more at http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jahzzar/

Jun 21, 2018

THIS WEEK / Separation anxiety: as the U.S. catches criticism for splitting up migrant families and isolating their kids, some wonder if the concern comes off as just a little bit selective / Tipi takedown: an encampment set up near Saskatchewan's legislature in honour of stolen Indigenous youth is removed for being 'disruptive' / Right idea, wrong route: the Supreme Court rules that the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal does not have the legal mandate to go after discrimination in the Indian Act.

Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama, and  Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, re-join host Rick Harp at the roundtable.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 16, 2018

THIS WEEK // Survey says: We opine on a poll asking Canadians what they think should be done regarding Indigenous peoples. Statistically insignificant: The auditor general does a number on the federal government's glaring gaps in data for First Nations reserves. Doggone DNA: Think you can trust those genetic tests that tell you how 'Indian' you are? Guess you missed that recent story of a lab that verified the tribal ancestry of a chihuahua!

Joining Rick Harp at the roundtable once again are Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 9, 2018

This weekYellowhead, Red Flags: We discuss the emergence of the Yellowhead Institute, a brand new First Nations think tank; we also look at why it's sounding the alarm over the Liberal government's 'Indigenous Rights, Recognition and Implementation Framework.' Sin of Omission: Why did the publisher of a famous Métis autobiography remove references to an alleged rape by an RCMP officer?

This week, host Rick Harp is joined by Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 4, 2018

Bitumen Buyer Beware? The Canadian government has just announced it will buy the beleaguered Trans Mountain pipeline project. Will their gamble pay off? And who loses if it doesn’t? * Trump-aganda! When it comes to a recent boast that Americans "tamed a continent," is POTUS 45 honestly all that brutal compared to other presidentsor just the most brutally honest? Two minutes for stereotyping: a non-native booster of the pro hockey team in Winnipeg finds himself on thin ice after referring to the deplorable conditions of some native people as "a terrible stain" on the city.

Joining host Rick Harp once again are Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

 

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 29, 2018

Sick and solo: why does Quebec still force northern kids who fly down south for care to do so all alone on air ambulances? Pity porn: we discuss a recent column critiquing the continued categorization of Indigenous people as dead, dying or doomed. Bitter brew: a VICE investigation exposes a Canadian coffee dealer’s efforts to support the white supremacist movement.

Joining host Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s Department of Drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting,' by birocratic.

May 18, 2018

1. Love for lava: Why some Indigenous people in Hawai’i reject any effort to divert the flow of what others see as the utterly destructive output of the Kilauea volcano. 2. Home away from home: First Nations youth whose only chance for an education is far away in Thunder Bay advocate for a student residence in the city. 3. Living laboratories: a class action lawsuit seeks compensation for decades of medical experiments conducted on Indigenous people without their knowledge.

Joining Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

// Our theme is nesting by birocratic,

May 15, 2018

This week // From bad to worse: amid accusations that racism drove an Indigenous dean of law away from Lakehead University, some question why it’s replaced her with a judge who jailed anti-mining Native leaders. Uneducated guess: how a white parent's paranoia almost turned two Native teens' dreams of college into a potential nightmare. Decision day: Quebec’s Superior Court quashes parts of Kahnawake’s controversial membership law. Back at the roundtable with host Rick Harp are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and U of A associate professor of Native studies Kim Tallbear.

 

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 5, 2018

Saddle up for our Settler sexuality sequel! Building on last week’s exploration of how Settler norms impact Indigenous notions of intimacy and interpersonal connections, we more explicitly discuss the erotically infused insights of Mohawk/Tuscarora writer, poet and broadcaster Janet Rogers. Insights she shared with our own Kim TallBear (associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) at ConvergeCon, the annual conference working to build sex positive communities. Joining host Rick Harp to reflect on Kim and Janet's dialogue is Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 27, 2018

On this week's roundtable: Settler Sexuality. A subject at the heart of two recent talks by our own Kim Tallbear (one at the sex-positive communities event ConvergeCon, the other at SoloPolyCon), we thought we'd use it as an opportunity to take a longer look at an often troubling and taboo topic. In particular, we discuss the insights of her keynote "Yes, Your Pleasure! Yes, Self-love! And Don’t Forget, Settler Sex Is A Structure" at the 2nd Annual Solo Polyamory Conference in Seattle, Washington.

An associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, Kim discussed her work at the MEDIA INDIGENA roundtable with host Rick Harp and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 23, 2018

1. Who will next lead the AFN? Two candidates say they’re set to run; a potential third is thinking about it. We’ll review the field of would-be leaders of the Assembly of First Nations. 2. Mutual benefit agreements: we look at what might drive First Nations to sign deals with the company behind the Kinder Morgan 'Trans Mountain' pipeline expansion. 3. Tiny houses: how big of a dent could they make in alleviating chronic over-crowding on reserve?

Joining host Rick Harp at the roundtable again are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous Studies at the University of Sudbury, and Kenneth Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta's Department of Drama. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 12, 2018

THIS WEEK // Big Steps: How some ancient footprints confirm (yet again) what Indigenous people keep telling scientists—how we’ve been here for a very, very long time. / A Whale of a Culture: We peek through a window into how Iñupiaq people continue to co-exist with, and connect to, the creatures whose world they share. / 'Take it to the Altar': A viral video vividly illustrates how 'Canada Reads' still shunts Indigenous authors to the bottom of the book pile.

Back at the roundtable are Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

Apr 6, 2018

THIS WEEK // A 'Nope' from the Pope: Why does His Holiness seem wholly against saying sorry for the crimes of Church-run residential schools? / Exoneration Examination: The Canadian government just cleared the name of six First Nations leaders wrongfully sentenced to death in 1864. But was it motivated by justiceor just politics? / Standing Rock North? We look at whether on-the-ground resistance to twinning Kinder Morgan's pipeline in BC has the potential to match what happened in North Dakota.

Joining host Rick Harp once again are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 30, 2018

THIS WEEK / 'Sorry' for the racism: As National Geographic tries to atone for its problematic history with non-white people, we assess how much credit (and critique) they deserve. / 'Sorry' for the sexual harassment: As Native American writer Sherman Alexie continues his free-fall amid accusations of mistreating women, we’ll read into his story for larger lessons. / 'Sorry' (not sorry) for the journalism: A Canadian reporter faces potential jail-time for embedding himself inside an Indigenous-led protest against an east coast mega-project.

Joining host Rick Harp at this week’s roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 25, 2018

This week, the sound of two Indigenous podcasters podcasting, as MEDIA INDIGENA host/producer Rick Harp sits down with Wayne K. Spear (waynekspear.com), a self-described "writing machine" whose prolific nature extends to audio as well. A Six Nations (Haudenosaunee) gentleman from southern Ontario, Wayne's world also includes work in organizational development and executive coaching, often for Indigenous clientele.

Now based in Toronto, Wayne was kind enough to recently host Rick at his home studio for an extended conversation, one that acted as a check-in at times on where MEDIA INDIGENA has ended up—and where it still hopes to go. (Our first such review took place back in July of 2016.) We're grateful to Wayne for allowing us to share this version of our recent sit-down on The Roundtable Podcast.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 15, 2018

This week... 1. A fair share of the pot: why a push to tax cannabis on-reserve is itself a taxing debate. 2. Cottage clash: why can’t a First Nation get full market value for its lakefront properties from its non-indigenous tenants? 3. Irreconcilable differences: an Indigenous student council says its members are fed up with being little more than an 'economy' to the University of Saskatchewan.

Joining host Rick Harp this week are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

Mar 9, 2018

Once upon a trigger: Did a school board and the media over-react after a parent found a children’s book about residential schools upsetting? Dumb pun: a Thunder Bay newspaper says it’s sorry for running a headline that makes light of a potential hate crime. Bite your tongues: A B.C. politician criticizes the province for investing more money in Indigenous languages revitalization instead of more cops.

Joining host Rick Harp are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 2, 2018

This week: A tale of two trials. Late last week, a jury found the man accused of murdering 15-year old Tina Fontaine to be "not guilty." The decision dealt another blow to those still processing the acquittal of the man once charged with the murder of 22-year-old Colten Boushie. Our roundtable is among those still working to process these court decisions, trying to make sense of how the Canadian justice system was seemingly incapable of producing anything remotely resembling resolution for the families of two young Indigenous people taken far too soon. We’ll discuss how we got here, the response and where justice for Tina and Colten might be found if not the courts.

Joining host Rick Harp at the roundtable are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama.

Feb 23, 2018

War in the west: as Alberta battles British Columbia over pipeline expansion, we look at whether a new front could open up against First Nations / Revisiting the review of resource projects: the Liberals claim their new bill better includes Indigenous perspectives in the assessment of energy mega-projects. Does it go far enough? / What's in a nickname? The US president jeeringly calls her 'Pocahontas.' But do Senator Elizabeth Warren's claims to Indigeneity even remotely hold up?

Back at the roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Calison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

 

Feb 15, 2018

It was a much-anticipated verdict in a much-discussed case: the 2016 shooting death of 22-year-old Colten Boushie, a member of the Red Pheasant First Nation in Saskatchewan. His accused killer: 56-year-old white farmer Gerald Stanley, charged with second-degree murder. A charge he was acquitted of last Friday evening, much to the shock, disgust, sadness and outrage of Indigenous people everywhere. This week on MEDIA INDIGENA, we discuss how we got to this point, the response, and where things might go from here.

Joining host Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 9, 2018

This week: Toodle-loo Wahoo! The majorly racist logo of a major league baseball team is knocked out of the park in Cleveland... sort of. Turfed by Trudeau: The PM's cross country road show gets awkward when so-called 'hecklers' are shown the heck out. Media victim-blaming: Recent headlines about a 15-year old girl seem to put her on trial as much as her accused killer.

Joining host Rick Harp this week are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 4, 2018

This week: The trial of Gerald Stanley, the man accused in the shooting death of Colten Boushie. We’ll look at who gets to be on the jury, and who doesn’t. Raw numbers: A report leaked to the media reveals just how much governments shortchange First Nations child welfare services in Manitoba. And, the sound of silence: a political activist who would only speak Hawaiian in court finds a seriously unsympathetic ear in the judge.   

Joining host/producer Rick Harp are Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama, and, Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 29, 2018

This week: the 'Change the Date' debate. We discuss what seems to have been the most controversial Australia Day yet. Plus, divine intervention? As the Chilean government turns up the heat, why would the Pope push the Mapuche to turn the other cheek? And: bison on the brink? It's an animal many still reverenow, a scientist raises fresh concerns about its future.

Joining host Rick Harp this week are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

 

Jan 21, 2018

This week.. Politician contrition: an Alberta MLA walks back some sweeping off-hand comments about Aboriginal voter behaviour in his riding; A flyer full of ire: anonymous posters at an Atlantic university proclaim Indigenous people to be the overwhelming "beneficiaries," not the "victims" of European culture. Debunking denial: We take a deep dive into the playbook of White 'Denialism.'

Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, return to the roundtable. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 14, 2018

This week: Beyak BootedA Canadian senator’s website gets her kicked out of the Conservative Party for controversial content about Indigenous people. Speech impediment—Why would the Nova Scotia government push a school board to re-word its territorial acknowledgement? Under-'PrEP-ed'Did Indigenous health advocates in BC drop the ball when it came to promoting a drug that helps prevent HIV? // At this week’s roundtable are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 7, 2018

This week: #NativeTwittermore than just a hashtag? Can its influence be felt off-line? Or is it simply a case of tweeting to the choir? Seal for saleFacebook reverses its refusal of seal-skin-related items on its platform. Split-shootera British Columbia court rules that a U.S.-based Indigenous man can legally hunt in Canada because his people’s territory pre-dates the border.

Back at the roundtable are Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of Drama, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studiesat the University of Alberta. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 1, 2018

 

The second of our two-part look back and look ahead on the year almost behind us and the 12 months to come. What is, or what could be, their Indigenous significance?

Back at our special four-member roundtable are Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama, Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Dec 23, 2017

What made 2017 a year of Indigenous significance? What might be in store for 2018? This week's show assembles the fulsome foursome for this year-end exercise, one that will take two episodes to manage. Joining host Rick Harp for all this heavy lifting are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, fellow U of A scholar Kim TallBear (associate professor of Native Studies), and Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury. // Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

 

Dec 16, 2017

Vote vice: we scrutinize the story of a Saskatchewan First Nation politician accused of buying votes with drugs, and muse over how media framing of stories about Indigenous corruption compares to coverage of mainstream political shenanigans; Harm reduction on the rez: we explore the promise of a public health approach to drug addiction; 'Hawks hoax: will an online prank about the name of Washington’s football team score with its intended audience?

Back at the table this week: Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

Dec 11, 2017

Monumental fight: US President Trump announces he'll significantly shrink the boundaries of two protected areas in the state of Utah, despite their deep significance to multiple tribes. Urban plot: How Indigenous women in one California city hope to use a non-profit land trust to re-take territory, one piece at a time. Getting reproductive rights reductively wrong? A politician hoping to lead Saskatchewan’s governing party flat out claims “First Nations don’t believe in abortion.”

Back at the roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Terese Mailhot, author and Tecumseh Postdoctoral Fellow at Purdue University.

Dec 3, 2017

Make BC 'Site C' free: A new summary of research into the mega-hydro project produces a flood of arguments against its completion. Will British Columbia's coalition government listen? Home is where the hurt is: Rules preventing non-Indigenous people from residing on the Kahnawake reserve are now being challenged in court by some of its Mohawk members. Absent audience: Canada’s auditor general claims politicians are basically ignoring his reports on indigenous issues.

Returning are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 27, 2017

1. We pore over a poll showing Native Americans who live in "majority-Native areas" in the U.S. face greater mistreatment than anyone else. 2. Pro-development = anti-Indian, or the other way around? We mine recent media narratives that declare environmentalists and First Nations at odds over resource extraction. 3. Breaking the boys club: we discuss musician and poet Joy Harjo speaking out on her struggles as a female Indigenous artist in male-dominated circles.

At the roundtable this week are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Terese Mailhot, writer and Tecumseh Postdoctoral Fellow in English at Purdue University.

Nov 19, 2017

This week, an extended conversation with Sarah de Leeuw, co-author of the recent paper, Turning a new page: cultural safety, critical creative literary interventions, truth and reconciliation, and the crisis of child welfare. Written with Margo Greenwood, the paper was produced as part of their work at the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health, where Sarah is a Research Associate, Margo the Academic Lead. Over the course of this discussion, we explore de Leeuw and Greenwood's argument that the ongoing crisis of Indigenous child apprehensions must be viewed in their historical and cultural contexts. That is, as an extension of long-standing violent discourses that validate the 'rights' of settler-colonial state powers like Canada to intervene into the lives of Indigenous families and communities with impunity. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 14, 2017

1. Downhill and out: Canada’s highest court rules against an Indigenous sacred site in favour of a ski resort. 2. White Hot: Conservative Twitter goes ballistic over a white professor’s claims that the white nuclear family reproduces white supremacy. 3. Re-Con: We check in on the second-ever Indigenous Comic Convention.

Returning to the roundtable are Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.  // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 4, 2017

1. No joke: Why some racist Halloween stunts have people at one Alberta university upset (if not all that surprised). 2. Re-definition: Can expanding and enriching what homelessness means for Indigenous people help yield better responses? 3. Storm clouds: Why has an award-winning video game about a Thunderbird sparked some political rumblings?

Back at the table this week are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

Oct 28, 2017

1. Hatin’ on Halloween? Why a non-native writer feels her 4-year-old was cheated of the chance to dress up as "a native princess." 2. Beothuk babble: Is an east coast Indigenous people reducible to their DNA? Some archaeologists and journalists seem to think so. 3. Another meal of seal: We’ll digest your comments about our earlier chat regarding one restaurant’s traditional menu.

Back at the roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 21, 2017

1. In name only: How did an Ontario city manage to strike up an Indigenous working group—minus any Indigenous people? 2. Ciao, chief! As a gesture of what it calls reconciliation, a school board decides it needs to drop the word “chief” from all of its employees’ job titles. 3. Book bind: After a number of contributors pull out of an Aboriginal anthology over the inclusion of an author convicted of domestic assault, the author asks the publisher to remove his work instead. We’ll discuss whether this sequence of events has made new room to discuss Indigenous male violence.

Back at the roundtable are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 14, 2017

1. Taste Testy: How the introduction of traditional foods in mainstream settings have inspired some, and incited others; 2. Bad Optics? A massive telescope gets the green light on the island of Hawai'i over the objections of local Indigenous people; 3. Settlement for Survivors: Canada offers $800 million to victims of the Sixties Scoop, but critics claim it’s inadequate in more ways than one.

Returning to the roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Taté Walker, Lakota activist and communications professional.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 7, 2017

1. Unfair Share: A group of First Nations take Canada and Ontario to court for not honouring a 167-year-old promise to top up treaty payments as resource revenues rise. 2. CAP Kerfuffle: Is the leader of the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples even Aboriginal? 3. Shameful or Shameless? Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tells the United Nations that the "failure of successive Canadian governments to respect the rights of Indigenous Peoples… is our great shame." But do his deeds even remotely match his words?

Returning to the roundtable are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 1, 2017

Has there been a media "witch-hunt" of Wab Kinew? A high-profile supporter has sounded a resounding 'yes.' But does the critique imply some Indigenous women are part of the pile-on? Multiple choice, singularly stupid: A BC parent is outraged after her 14-year old is assigned a test asking students to select the correct slur for an Aboriginal woman. Fashion fabrication: Yet another non-Indigenous designer stands accused of inappropriate appropriation. We’ll hear how Versace vexes the critics and share an example of how to design right.

Returning to the roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

 

Sep 23, 2017

This week... Kinew Conundrum: will old assault charges against the new leader of Manitoba’s New Democratic Party divide the Indigenous community? TB Plea: HIV/AIDS advocate Stephen Lewis issues a passionate call for the feds to step up their response to tuberculosis among Inuit. Unhappy Anniversary: a recent national magazine article suggests that, one year on, the missing and murdered women’s inquiry is imploding.

Returning are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama and Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury.

Sep 16, 2017

Fight of the Freedmen: Has a court victory for the descendants of ex-slaves of the Cherokee guaranteed the return of their citizenship? Casting controversy: Why Adam Beach wants other Aboriginal actors to boycott a new television series. Out of Print: why it looks very much like there’s no tomorrow for Indian Country Today.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

 

Sep 11, 2017

This week's Indigenous roundtable gets up close and personal with the people behind the show. As long-time listeners know, we at the podcast have brought you a wealth of voices on a variety of topics, week after week. But, as of this very episode, we’re pleased to announce a shift to a more permanent roster: joining host/producer Rick Harp are Brock Pitawanakwat, Ken Williams, Kim Tallbear and Taté Walker.

So, exactly who are these people? And if they’re gonna be roundtable regulars, shouldn’t we know a bit more about them first? Answering those questions is what this episode is all about. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 5, 2017

Double the fun or double trouble? Seemingly out of nowhere, the federal Liberals have decided to re-arrange the political furniture as part of a late summer shuffle of their Cabinet. What is now Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada will be cleaved in two—in future, First Nations will have to deal with the department of "Crown-Indigenous relations and Northern Affairs" and the department of "Indigenous Services." But will INAC be cleaved so much as cloned? What does this ostensible re-org actually, concretely mean? In light of this unexpected shift, we’re doing a shift of our own this week to go as deep as possible on exactly these questions with special guests Russ Diabo, a Kahnawake Mohawk analyst, writer and activist, and Peter Di Gangi, a land rights researcher and analyst with Sicani Research.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Aug 28, 2017

Ottawa gets a new, Indigenous-only courtroom, but does the evidence support the move? Why critics say electronic welfare cards are being used to police the behaviour of recipients in Australia. How Iqaluit’s new beer and wine store hopes to keep a damper on drinking by customers. Rounding out this week’s Indigenous roundtable are host/producer Rick Harp along with the University of Alberta's Kim TallBear (Native Studies) and Ken Williams (Drama). // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Aug 21, 2017

This week... Why Indigenous people totally relate to recent violence over icons of intolerance in Charlottesville, Virginia; we get into Guam, a strategic US island colony that found itself smack dab in the middle of nuclear brinkmanship with North Korea; and, Inuk singer Tanya Tagaq adds her voice to calls for the Edmonton Eskimos to change their team’s name. Returning to the roundtable are Lakota activist/communicator Taté Walker, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

Aug 13, 2017

This week's Indigenous roundtable: a new study seems to solidify the link between homelessness and contact with the child welfare system; new data reveals a disproportionate number of Indigenous deaths due to overdose in British Columbia; and, with the big Santa Fe Indian Art market around the corner, we discuss its approach to the perennial debate over "authentic" Indigenous art. Joining us are Lakota activist and communications professional Taté Walker and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Aug 6, 2017

This week: Starvation, experimentation, segregation and traumato Mary Jane McCallum, these four words are critical concepts for any student of Indigenous health history. And she should know: a full professor of history at the University of Winnipeg, McCallum has studied and written about the subject extensively, including a recent article for The Canadian Historical Review. With a title that bears those four same words, McCallum’s piece discusses how these phenomena factor into every encounter of Indigenous people with mainstream health care systems, policies and research practices, and thus continue to racialize and colonize Aboriginal people. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jul 29, 2017

This week... the conclusion to our conversation with the authors of the recent article, "White Settler Revisionism and Making Métis Everywhere: The Evocation of Métissage in Québec and Nova Scotia." Scholars Adam Gaudry (Native Studies & Political Science, University of Alberta) and Darryl Leroux (Sociology & Atlantic Canada studies, Saint Mary’s University) return to discuss why this urge of some Settlers to 'play Métis' is a fantasy that could prove fatal to the rights of all Indigenous peoples in Canada. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jul 23, 2017

This week… the first in a two-part conversation that confronts the confusion and contention around what it means to be Métis. In their new article, "White Settler Revisionism and Making Métis Everywhere: The Evocation of Métissage in Québec and Nova Scotia." Co-authors Adam Gaudry (University of Alberta) and Darryl Leroux (Saint Mary’s University) argue that moves by some settler communities to insert a "Métis" identity into places and periods they don’t belongnamely, outside the Prairie homelands of the historic Métis Nationall in an effort to "self-Indigenize," don’t just constitute wrong-headed fantasy, but a real and present danger to genuine Indigenous self-determination. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jul 15, 2017

This week… a bit of a mid-summer break from our regular format as we take a deep dive into the fiscal infrastructure of colonialism in Canada. As technocratic as that sounds, our guest expertly deciphers how boring bureaucracy can enable inhumane inequity. Our guide on this journey is Shiri Pasternak, Assistant Professor in Criminology at Ryerson University, and the author of a 5-part series entitled, “Resistance 150: Unsettling Canada’s Hidden Economic Apartheid.” It appears on Ricochet.media, a digital news outlet dedicated to public interest journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jul 9, 2017

This week... tempest in a teepee: Indigenous people fight to set up a ceremonial camp on Parliament Hill for Canada Day. Did their actions shine a light on the controversy over Canada 150—or simply stoke the flames of a backlash? We also explore how a press conference meant to educate reporters on why that teepee went up seemingly mutated into a media lecture on how Indigenous people ought to conduct themselves.

At the roundtable this week are Kenneth Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, plus Lakota activist and communications professional Taté Walker.

Jul 2, 2017

This week, is the state of Indigenous health care plagued by governmental ill will? Some might think so in Alberta, where a pair of provincial employees were punted for a racist text message about a First Nations school principal. Meanwhile, in Ottawa, the political battle over health care inequity for on-reserve kids continues as the feds announce they want parts of a human rights ruling quashed. Joining us this week with their diagnoses of what might be at the root of both situations are two physicians. Dr. Lisa Richardson is a clinician-educator with the University of Toronto's division of general internal medicine. Dr. Jason Pennington is a staff surgeon at Scarborough General Hospital and an assistant professor at the University of Toronto. Together, they serve as co-Leads for Indigenous Health Education with the U of T’s Office of Indigenous Medical Education. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 25, 2017

This week... When words fail: Especially when one hears about the enormous equity gap in federal funding between French and Inuit languages in Nunavut. Plus... Putting us on the map—literally. Google announces that users of its Maps app will now get to see thousands more Indigenous communities. But will that hide as much as it reveals?
 
Back again at the roundtable are Karyn Pugliese, APTN's Executive Director of News and Current Affairs, plus Lisa Girbav, a radio broadcaster and student from the Tsimshian territory.

Jun 18, 2017

This week: why things aren't okay in Thunder Bay. In the wake of two more Indigenous teens found dead in this northwestern Ontario city’s waterways, their home First Nations are sounding alarm bells, but local police maintain there is no crisis. And WTF is a MOU, and why should we care? We unpack the recent signing of a joint memorandum of understanding between the Canadian government and the Assembly of First Nations. Back again are Karyn Pugliese, APTN's Executive Director of News and Current Affairs with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network and Lisa Girbav, a radio broadcaster from the Tsimshian territory and a student at UBC. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 10, 2017

This week: Questioning curious carriages of justice in Canadian courts. Questions like, how is it that a victim of a brutal assault in Alberta not only gets locked up in remand against her will but was made to testify cuffed and chained?! And how did an Inuk grandmother from Labrador end up in an all-men’s prison for opposing a controversial hydroelectric mega-project? Returning to the roundtable are Karyn Pugliese, APTN Executive Director of News and Current Affairs, and Lisa Girbav, a radio broadcaster from the Tsimshian territory and a student at UBC. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 3, 2017

This week... outrageous outfits: A group of Alberta students host a controversial "Cowboys & Indians" costume graduation party. Plus, rough ride: a northern Manitoba man says he was unfairly ejected from a Greyhound bus5 hours from homeafter his diabetes-related symptoms were mistakenly thought to be signs of drunkenness. Joining us this week are Karyn Pugliese, Executive Director of News and Current Affairs with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, and Lisa Girbav, a radio broadcaster from the Tsimshian territory and a student at the University of British Columbia. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 29, 2017

This week, an extended conversation with two of the people behind 'Unsettling Canada 150.' Planned for the exact same date as Canada Day—July 1—this national, Indigenous-led day of action will serve as a counter-action to the multi-million dollar, orgiastic commemoration of the country’s 150th anniversary of Confederation. A joint initiative of the movements known as Idle No More and Defenders of the Land, 'Unsettling Canada 150' will feature a series of events in the weeks leading up to July 1st. Our guests are Janice Makokis, legal scholar and First Nations advisor, and First Nations policy analyst Russ Diabo. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 22, 2017

On this week’s roundtable: sensationalizing suicide? We recount the critiques of 13 Reasons Why, the Netflix teen drama that's sparked controversy for centering the suicide of one of its characters. And shaking off Shakespeare: amid the recent kerfuffle over cultural appropriation, we’ll discuss why one Ontario school board has booted the Bard in favour of Indigenous authors. Joining us at our roundtable are Jessica Deer, a staff reporter with the Eastern Door newspaper in Kahnawake, and, in Phoenix, Arizona, Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker.

 

May 14, 2017

This week, a breakdown of the BC election, the result of which is still up in the air, leaving Indigenous peoples with all sorts of questions. Questions like which would be better or worse for their interests, a Liberals/Greens coalition or NDP/Greens? How much Indigenous issues factored into this election, or how much Indigenous voters did? And how did Indigenous candidates fare? Our roundtable welcomes two BC-based journalists, Angela Sterritt of CBC Vancouver and CBC Indigenous, and Wawmeesh Hamilton, who works for CBC and Discourse Media. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 7, 2017

This week, an extended interview with James Daschuk, author of Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life. The award-winning book is a harrowing, historical account of Canada's original Aboriginal policyre-location via starvation.

In this conversation, originally recorded in 2014, Daschuk discusses his investigation into the roles that disease, climate and politics played in the deaths and subjugation of thousands of Aboriginal people in the late 1800s, an era when Canada’s first prime ministerJohn A. Macdonaldrelentlessly pursued his so-called 'National Dream.' A pursuit that coincided with the often nightmarish existence of first peoples on the Plains. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 29, 2017

THIS WEEK: We delve into an Indigenous woman's 30-year-plus court battle to regain her Indian Status, a battle that just resulted in victory in Ontario. But will Lynn Gehl's win against the sexism of Canada's Indian Status system endure? If so, what could it mean for thousands just like her? We then look at Bill S-3, a bill that, like Gehl's case, deals with gender discrimination in the Indian Act but, like most federal fixes in this area, only seems to exacerbate the problem it was meant to solve. Joining us again are scholar Pam Palmater and author Paul Seesequasis. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 22, 2017

This week: Transportation Troubles. In Saskatchewan, a recent government budget announced the shutdown of the STC, a provincial bus service that critics say is a lifeline for rural communities and reserves. Meanwhile in Manitoba, a First Nations owned airline was stunned to learn that it too could have its wings clipped after news that the province will end its support for a local airport. Returning to the roundtable to discuss the implications of these cuts are academic Pam Palmater and writer Paul Seesequasis.

Apr 15, 2017

This week, a double dive into recent moves by Health Canada: first, its decision to fund the cost of a travel companion for pregnant Indigenous women who give birth outside their community; second, is social media an effective way for the department to connect to Indigenous kids in need of medical care? Sharing their diagnoses are scholar Pam Palmater and writer Paul Seesequasis. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 8, 2017

THIS WEEK / Colonial Editorial: Why people like ex-TRC head Murray Sinclair are outraged by a Globe and Mail op-ed rejecting the idea that South Africa's experience with oppression parallels that of Canada’s. Is the Globe guilty of whitesplaining? / Third-party Mis-management: a federal Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs continues to hear whether the practice of forcing First Nations to rely on outside managers to run their communities can somehow be improved. The kind of question that kind of answers itself. Joining the roundtable are: Pam Palmater, the Chair in Indigenous Governance with the department of Politics and Public Administration at Ryerson University, along with writer and journalist Paul Seesequasis. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 3, 2017

On this week's Indigenous roundtable, we examine mainstream Canadian media and reconciliation. When the Truth and Reconciliation Commission issued its nearly 100 Calls to Action back in late 2015, the fourth estate was among the institutions encouraged to take up those calls. It's been well over a year: what action has been taken? What has that meant for how stories about Indigenous people get told? To what extent have national media managed to overcome their legacy as channels of Canadian colonialism? And how do individual Indigenous journalists navigate the needs and vantage points of news outlets serving a predominantly non-Indigenous audience? Joining us this week to discuss these questions are Waubgeshig Rice, author and video-journalist with CBC News Ottawa, and Hayden King, an assistant professor with Carleton University’s School of Public Policy & Administration.

Mar 25, 2017

On this week's roundtable: Federal foot-dragging. The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ordered feds to stop underfunding child welfare on-reserve back in 2016. So why has it still yet to happen? And, Departmental dysfunction: a recent news report describes a section of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada as a "deeply troubled, if not toxic, work environment." But is it a localized infection or a rot that's more wide-spread? Danika Billie Littlechild and Robert Jago return.

Mar 18, 2017

On this week's Indigenous roundtable: Do growing calls for tougher laws deliberately target some more than others? A look at the apparent push to increasingly criminalize Aboriginal behaviour by non-Aboriginal interests. Plus, how a disproportionate number of Indigenous people throughout Canada struggle with severe food insecurity. Returning to the roundtable are Danika Billie Littlechild and Robert Jago. // Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Mar 11, 2017

This weekAttention Status Indian men: do you have sperm to spare? Some women on Craigslist are hoping you'll consider making what might be called a liquid transaction. And proudly unpatriotic: a Native student at an Oklahoma high school is reprimanded for refusing to pledge allegiance to the United States.

Joining us once again are entrepreneur and commentator Robert Jago and lawyer and international advocate Danika Billie Littlechild.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 5, 2017

On this week's Indigenous roundtable: fire and water. A new investigation into the overall state of First Nations fire prevention and protection in Canada paints an abysmal picture. But with no shortage of suggested solutions, the real question is why they have yet to be implemented. And, a drop in the bucket: it's one of Trudeau's biggest promises to First Nations—an end to boil water advisories by 2020. And in fact some have been lifted, only to see other communities join the list. In the face of this glacial pace, has hope for real change from the Liberals pretty much evaporated?

Joining us this month for the first time are Montreal-based entrepreneur and commentator Robert Jago and Danika Billie Littlechild, a lawyer and international advocate based in Maskwacis, Alberta.

Feb 25, 2017

This week, two troubling stories of Indigenous institutionalization. The first comes to us from an Ontario jail where 9 out of 10 inmates are Aboriginal—and 10 out of 10 reportedly face challenges of a mental, cognitive or addictive nature. The second features numbers no less startling: one young First Nations man, 18 years in the foster care system, put in and pulled out of 73 different homes! A hard life made only worse now that he's been charged with the recent killing of a Winnipeg transit driver. Joining us once again: scholar Brock Pitawanakwat and journalist Wawmeesh Hamilton. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 20, 2017

On this week's Indigenous roundtable… Success for Survivors: Despite attempts by both the Harper Conservatives and the Trudeau Liberals to keep former adoptees out of Ontario courts, not only was their Sixties Scoop class-action suit heard, they won. What could it mean for similar suits in other jurisdictions? And, Putting our peoples first: a one-time deputy premier under Manitoba’s previous NDP government thinks the party has abandoned Aboriginal people like him—will his pitch for a new party see Indigenous issues get more attention, or just more marginalized?

Returning to the roundtable once again are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Wawmeesh Hamilton, a journalist and photographer based in Vancouver.

//Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 11, 2017

This week, it's Women on the Watchlist: why were rallies in support of an inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls on the radar of Canada's national security apparatus? 
Plus, 

Inherited Issues: Rival claims to hereditary leadership in BC have ended up in a non-Indigenous court. Is this the ultimate in irony or just the logical outcome of outside interference? Back at the roundtable once again are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Wawmeesh Hamilton, a Vancouver-based journalist and photographer. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 3, 2017

On this week's Indigenous roundtable: Make room for men—we try to decipher recent revelations that the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls will examine "ways in which the testimonies and stories of men and boys might be collected," sparking fears that it risks de-centering the voices and perspectives of those it was set up to serve. And: Street fight in Port Alberni, BC—what do you do when a road where you live is named after a dead white supremacist? According to a majority of city council, apparently nothing at all.

Joining us are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Wawmeesh Hamilton, a Vancouver-based journalist and photographer.

Jan 28, 2017

This week, we discuss a western Canadian premier's racializing of the contentious issue of night-time moose hunting: could his hyperbole put Aboriginal people in the cross-hairs? And, the ambivalence of benevolencean anonymous donor has pledged almost $400,000 to support a First Nation reeling after two 12-year-old girls took their own lives, seven months after the community’s request for federal suicide prevention funds went nowhere. But how could such a 'charity case' approach possibly work for the dozens of other communities in similar straits? Back again are criminologist Lisa Monchalin and youth advocate Michael Redhead Champagne. // Our theme is 'nesting,' by birocratic.

Jan 23, 2017

This week, a look at the legacy of the late Arthur Manuel, whose vision of Indigenous rights was uncompromising. We also discuss a National Observer report suggesting that the Canadian government is backtracking on its pledge to be more transparent about its legal positions vis-à-vis Aboriginal and treaty rights. Our roundtable welcomes back Lisa Monchalin and Michael Redhead Champagne.

Jan 14, 2017

On this week's roundtable: the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Some 4 months after its official launch, critics question its progress to date ahead of its November 2018 deadline. And, on-reserve rape kits: Health Canada gets called out for not moving quicker on a request from northern Ontario First Nations trying to take action on sexual assault investigations.

Joining us once again are criminologist Lisa Monchalin and youth advocate Michael Redhead Champagne.

Jan 8, 2017

On this week's Indigenous roundtable: a northern Ontario outfit that rents huts to ice-fishers is in hot water after an ad on Kijiji tells Status Indians to stay away! Plus, Canada 150: a century and a half after the country’s creation, what exactly do Aboriginal peoples have to celebrate? Joining the MEDIA INDIGENA roundtable this month are Lisa Monchalin, author of The Colonial Problem: An Indigenous Perspective on Crime and Injustice in Canada, and Michael Champagne, founder of Aboriginal Youth Opportunities and the Canadian Red Cross 2016 Young Humanitarian of the Year.

Dec 31, 2016

On this week's Indigenous roundtable, we look back and ahead—what were the trends and themes that defined this past year for Indigenous peoples, and what might the next 12 months bring? According to our roundtable, 2016 was a breakout year for empowering Indigenous media artistry and activism. It also ended with a bang, as heated discussions about identity fraud re-ignited after new revelations about acclaimed author Joseph Boyden. Joining us once more are Cutcha Risling Baldy, Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies at San Diego State University, and Taté Walker, editor of Native Peoples magazine.

Dec 23, 2016

This week's podcast, a kind of holiday edition, features an interview Rick conducted back in 2011 with Ryerson University professor Christopher Powell about his then-new book, "Barbaric Civilization: A Critical Sociology of Genocide," published by McGill-Queen's University Press. The interview appears courtesy of NCI-FM, where it first aired.

Dec 17, 2016

On this week's Indigenous roundtable... Jennifer Lawrence's 'sorry' butt: the Hunger Games star has apologized after social media slammed her conduct at a sacred site in Hawai'i but critics say her mealy-mouthed words of so-called contrition only made things worse. And Cherokee choose change: a senior legal official with the tribe reverses a 9-year-old ban on same-sex marriage. We'll look into what prompted the decision and where other communities across the U-S stand on the matter.

United yet again to talk United States’ stories making headlines are Cutcha Risling Baldy, an Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies at San Diego State University, and Taté Walker, editor of Native Peoples magazine.

Dec 9, 2016

On this week's roundtable... Return to the Rock: last episode, the future of the fight against the Dakota Access pipeline project seemed uncertain, with many opponents fearing the worst. Then on Sunday, to the surprise of many, the Army announced it would not permit construction to proceed. But will the company behind the pipeline listen? And, Looming land grab? We'll discuss a Reuters report suggesting some members of the Trump team will push the President-elect to privatize treaty lands so billions in oil and gas reserves can finally be extracted. Joining us once again are Cutcha Risling Baldy, an Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies at San Diego State University, and Taté Walker, editor of Native Peoples magazine.

Dec 3, 2016

On this week's Indigenous roundtable...

Where do things stand with Standing Rock? The struggle in North Dakota against the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline continues to face constant pressure from federal and state authorities. With winter weather only adding to the challenges, how much longer can these thousands of activists hold out? Plus, Pixar Polynesian: the Disney-owned studio's newest animated release is earning cautious kudos for its depiction of a young girl's quest to save her people. But is Moana really a respectful representation of Indigenous life or just more cultural tourism? This week’s roundtable features Cutcha Risling Baldy is an Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies at San Diego State University and Taté Walker, editor of Native Peoples magazine.

// Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Nov 27, 2016

On this week's program... The all-too-brown face of child poverty in British Columbia: a new report details the frustratingly familiar reasons why and what to do, but will governments act?

Plus, the bigger picture underlying why educators on a northern First Nation have walked out over wages at a reserve high school.

Returning this week to our roundtable, Ken Williams, playwright-in-residence at the University of Saskatchewan and Patrice Mousseau, a journalist and entrepreneur.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 19, 2016

On this week's show... invalidation in Val d'Or: Why have three-dozen Aboriginal accusations of police abuse in this Quebec town come up empty? Plus, smudge grudge: a BC parent is suing her children's school because she claims it forced them to take part in a religious Indigenous ceremony.

Joining us at this week's roundtable are Ken Williams, playwright-in-residence at the University of Saskatchewan and APTN News & Current Affairs director Karyn Pugliese.

// Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Nov 13, 2016

On this week's program: Trump triumph... what could the election of this outrageously racist man mean for Indigenous peoples in the US and beyond? And, another First Nation goes to pot. That is, if the Siksika in Alberta get their way, as Canada’s first Indigenous purveyors of medical marijuana.

Joining us once again at the roundtable are Ken Williams and Patrice Mousseau.

 

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 6, 2016

On this week's Indigenous roundtable…

Triggering Tension: non-Aboriginal hunters in Manitoba are upset after an Indigenous leader made no bones about bagging a bull in a no-kill zone; and, Sticker Shock: an Alberta trucker sets off a social media tsunami due to a giant decal on his rig that reads "one squaw too many."

Joining us this week are two new roundtablers: from Saskatoon, Ken Williams, playwright-in-residence at the University of Saskatchewan and a former reporter with APTN National News. And in Vancouver, Patrice Mousseau, a journalist and entrepreneur whose broadcast credits include CBC, Aboriginal Voices Radio and the anchor chair for APTN National News.

Oct 29, 2016

This week's Indigenous current affairs roundtable discusses the controversial, much-criticized, Muskrat Falls hydro project in Labrador: has an 11th-hour negotiation addressed the critics' concerns? And the Public Health Agency of Canada has shone a spotlight on the issue of family violence in its annual report, including how it impacts Indigenous families.

Joining us once again on this week’s roundtable are Colleen Simard and Conrad Prince.

 

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 22, 2016

This week on our Indigenous current affairs roundtable: is Alberta all wet when it comes to Indigenous water rights? A recent story in the Globe and Mail suggests the province’s view may be skewed when it comes to whose rights take priority.

Plus, a First Nation in British Columbia says it wants to administer drug tests to all its politicians and employees as a way to combat drug abuse. Will it work?

Joining us once again are Colleen Simard and Conrad Prince.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 15, 2016

This week, our Indigenous current affairs roundtable unpacks recent revelations that, despite federal bureaucrats saying the cupboard for First Nations education funding was full, the Liberals deliberately chose to delay a large chunk of it until after the next election. And, we’ll share our thoughts on an alarming report out of BC that shows First Nations kids in custody suffer alarming rates of sexual abuse. Joining us once again are Colleen Simard and Conrad Prince. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

 

Oct 7, 2016

Ottawa's police force is taking some heat after one of its own appears to have posted racist comments on a local newspaper’s website. The commentary followed a story about the tragic and untimely death of acclaimed Inuk artist Annie Pootoogook. The police are investigating, calling her death "suspicious," but won’t get into specifics. Meanwhile, members of Ottawa's Indigenous community are outraged that a police officer would even publicly comment on the case, much less dismiss the idea that Pootoogook's death deserves to be spoken of in the same breath as the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women. Sitting at the roundtable to discuss this incident, and what it may say about the attitudes of rank and file police, are Colleen Simard and Conrad Prince.

Sep 30, 2016

A First Nation that only seems to get the spotlight when bad things happen is once again in the headlines: Shamattawa. Literally left devastated last week after a major fire destroyed key services and infrastructureincluding the reserve's only grocery storeit's all the more worrisome when you consider the northeastern Manitoba community is only accessible by plane or boat most of the year. Then there's the disturbing cause of the blaze: according to the RCMP, it was started by a group of children, most of whom aren't even 12 years old.

Shamattawa's high rates of poverty, unemployment, substance abuse and youth suicide are well-documented by news outlets. Less so are the efforts of its people to reverse these trends. Among the more determined is this week's guest: Michael Redhead Champagne, founder of Aboriginal Youth Opportunities in Winnipeg.

Sep 22, 2016

For the third time in 9 months, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal has ordered the federal government to end its discriminatory practice of inequitably funding child welfare services on-reserve. The Tribunal’s initial ruling happened in January, the result of a 2007 human rights complaint. But despite Indigenous Affairs Canada being told to "immediately remove the most discriminatory aspects of [its] funding schemes" for First Nations agencies, the federal government has failed to show the Tribunal how it’s done so. Will this latest order to comply make a difference? Joining us with her observations is lawyer Maggie Wente, part of the legal team advising the Chiefs of Ontario, which has "interested party" status at these proceedings.

Sep 15, 2016

According to The Guardian, it's a discovery that "challenges the accepted history behind one of polar exploration’s deepest mysteries." This week, 168 years after it sank, a ship once captained by the famous British explorer Sir John Franklin seems to have finally been found. Known as the HMS Terror, it was one of two large crafts used by the ill-fated Franklin expedition, now the stuff of legend for both Britain and its colonial offspring, Canada. But amidst these tales of Terror's ruin and reported recovery in Arctic waters, we might ask where Arctic people fit into all of this. Our guest this episode is Kisha Supernant, an anthropological archaeologist and associate professor at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. // Our theme is 'nesting,' by birocratic.

Sep 9, 2016

This week: Standing up for the Standing Rock Sioux. For the US state of North Dakota, massive deposits of unconventional oil have brought much prosperity for some, great pain to others. In a bid to get even more of that oil to market, a new project is underway: the Dakota Access Pipeline. But the 1900 km, $3.8 billion project has long been opposed by local Indigenous people, the Standing Rock Sioux, who argue any spill would both devastate regional water sources and desecrate sites of spiritual significance. Pipeline proponents claim it will boost jobs, revenues, even safety, when compared to oil moved by rail or road. My guest this week has been an ardent follower of this struggle. A member of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe in neighbouring South Dakota, Taté Walker is the editor of Native Peoples magazine.

Sep 4, 2016

According to preliminary new data released this week, Indigenous people in Canada are 10 times more likely to use an emergency shelter than their non-Indigenous counterparts. That's according to the National Shelter Study, a decade-long look at the use of emergency shelter beds across the country. And for the first time ever, the study has tracked stats according to Indigenous identity. Our guest this week is Jesse Thistle, a graduate student of history who once spent much of his young adulthood in and out of homelessness and addiction. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Aug 26, 2016

If families form the bedrock of Indigenous peoples, it seems Canada has devoted decades to their fracture and fragmentation. And, as child advocate Cindy Blackstock notes, were we to label the forced institutionalization of children in faraway residential schools as 'phase one' of that fracturing, the subsequent removal of generations of kids into the homes of non-Aboriginal strangers in the 1960s could be called 'phase two.' The so-called 'Scoop' removed thousands of kids from a number of provinces. But, this week, it was an Ontario court that heard the latest phase of a class action suit seeking compensation for what survivors say Canada denied them: rightful access to "Aboriginal customs, traditions and practices." Our guest is Raven Sinclair, associate professor of social work at the University of Regina, and a Scoop survivor herself.

Aug 18, 2016

Senseless, tragic and disturbing: words that rush to mind upon hearing the news of last week’s killing of Colten Boushie. A 22-year-old resident of the Red Pheasant First Nation in western Canada, Boushie was shot to death after he and four other Indigenous young people drove onto the property of 54-year-old, non-Indigenous farmer Gerald Stanley in hopes of getting help with a flat tire.

What happened next is still under investigation, but that hasn’t stopped some from drawing and sharing their own hurtful and hateful conclusions via social media. Our guests this week both hail from Saskatchewan: Tasha Hubbard is a documentarian and assistant professor of English at the University of Saskatchewan; Chris Andersen is interim dean at the University of Alberta’s faculty of Native Studies. They share their thoughts as to what Boushie's deathand its contentious aftermathmight tell us about the state of Indigenous/non-Indigenous relations in that province and beyond. // Our theme: 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Aug 12, 2016

Will it happen again? Will someone portrayed on-screen by Aboriginal actor Adam Beach be quickly dispensed with, leaving us next to no time to really know his character? According to our guest this week, it's been something of a pattern for Mr. Beachindeed, it's a fate faced by all too many Indigenous actors in Hollywood, as they appear all too briefly in mainstream television and film productions. Cutcha Risling Baldy is an Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies at San Diego State University. She's also the author of the 2015 blog post, "I Can't Believe You Keep Killing Off Adam Beach, NBC: Gender, Representation, Settler Colonialism and Native Cameos on Television." In the course of exploring what's at stake in how Indigenous people are represented by the major studios, we'll also discuss whether Beach's latest role as SlipKnot in the summer superhero flick, "Suicide Squad," breaks with the pattern she's described. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Aug 5, 2016

When loved ones die, there’s no question who suffers most—their families. And of those who pushed hardest for the newly-launched National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, none fought more fiercely than the relatives of these stolen sisters. Now some of those families have been left disappointed by the details of its terms of reference. Such concerns are echoed by groups like the Native Women’s Association of Canada and Pauktuutit, who say there are fundamental flaws in the Inquiry’s scale and scope. Joining us this week with her reflections is Pam Palmater, Chair in Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University in Toronto. // Our theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Jul 28, 2016

According to the WHO, food security is “when all people, at all times, have access to sufficient, safe, nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active life.” In Canada's north, food access and affordability are critical issues—especially for many Indigenous communitiesand government subsidies seem to only go so far. Madeleine Redfern, mayor of Iqaluit (Nunavut's capital city), discusses her territory's challenges with food insecurity and how the 'Nutrition North' subsidy program might be improved to better serve Inuit. // Our theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

 

Jul 23, 2016

This week on the program: Inaction on the Indian Act. Derided for decades, it’s hung in there as one of Canada’s oldest laws. Now there are hints from the federal Justice Minister that its days could be numbered... just not right away. Joining us with her thoughts on the delayed dismantling of the Act is Naomi Sayers, a law student active in legal reform and education who writes under the banner of kwetoday.com.// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jul 15, 2016

An Indigenous broadcaster shares his personal and political perspective on police treatment of Aboriginal people, an issue he recently wrote about in his Huffington Post piece, "This Is Why People Of Colour Fear The Police." Jesse Wente is the director of Film Programmes at TIFF Bell Lightbox, and a long-time CBC Radio pop culture columnist. He joined us from Toronto. // Our theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Jul 12, 2016

Fresh off our week at the Podcast Movement conference in Chicago, the team behind MEDIA INDIGENA 'checks in' on our progress 18 weeks into the show. We share our experiences, lessons and successes—including our ultimate, larger vision for the show's future, both on and off the mic. Featuring Ian Milne, MI's Head of Audience & Partnership Development. // Our theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Jun 30, 2016

New research out of the University of Toronto into Indigenous child welfare has highlighted what some already suspected: that, when it comes to investigations of abuse or neglect, Indigenous families in Ontario are way more likely to be investigated than their white counterparts—130 per cent more, in fact. The disparity grows even greater for child removal, with young Aboriginal people 168 per cent more likely to be taken. But such over-representation is not unique to Ontario. Canada-wide, the most recent numbers show fully a third of all children and youth in care are Aboriginal. Our guest this week is Kenn Richard, executive director of Native Child and Family Services of Toronto. // Our theme is "nesting" by Bee-row-Crat-ic.

Jun 26, 2016

This week: the fight for funding of Indigenous languages. Despite the best efforts of the Canadian government to wipe out the roughly 60 Aboriginal languages in that part of the world (what some call deliberate linguicide) those ancestral tongues are not yet stilled. But this is no time for complacency, which is why people like Lorena Fontaine, an associate professor of Indigenous Governance at the University of Winnipeg, is part of the team behind a lawsuit that they hope will force Canada to truly walk its talk on Indigenous language revitalization. // Our theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Jun 16, 2016

According to its proponents, Indigenous public health goes beyond the original concept to encourage health practitioners to be more aware of the larger social, political and historical issues and dynamics that often drive Aboriginal health disparities. This week’s episode comes to you from Toronto, host to “Public Health 2016,” the annual conference of the Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA). Our guests are Nancy Laliberte and Alycia Fridkin of the Provincial Health Services Authority of British Columbia. // Our theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

 

Jun 9, 2016

"Contaminated, hard to access or toxic." According to a new Human Rights Watch report, that’s what all too many First Nations endure when it comes to safe, quality drinking water—in some cases, for decades.  Our guest this week is Amanda Klasing, a senior HRW researcher and the author of its report, “Make it Safe: Canada’s Obligation to End the First Nations Water Crisis.”

// Our theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic

Jun 5, 2016

One of Canada's largest provinces now says it's sorry for its "silence in the face of abuses and deaths at residential schools... [and] for the continued harm that generations of abuse is causing to Indigenous communities, families and individuals." The formal apology by the Ontario government comes almost one year after Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission issued its final report. But will Ontario’s actions speak louder than its words? Joining us with his reflections on the rhetoric versus realities of reconciliation is comedian and podcaster Ryan McMahon.

// Our theme is "nesting" by Birocratic.

May 28, 2016

This week, we get an update on the inquest into a series of young First Nation fatalities in northwestern Ontario, where seven Indigenous students have died over a 10 year period in the city of Thunder Bay. Our guest is Jody Porter, a local CBC journalist who's covered this story for years, including regular updates from the inquest.

// Our theme is "nesting" by Birocratic.

May 24, 2016

This week we take a long look at a provocative poll recently published by the Washington Post about their home town pro football club, the "Redskins." The paper claims the results supposedly show "how few ordinary Indians have been persuaded by a national movement to change the football team’s moniker." Not surprisingly, team owner Daniel Snyder immediately celebrated the findings, but critics claim the poll should be punted for its shaky methodology and the way it ignores how a racial slur like the R-word diminishes Indigenous self-esteem as well as poisons mainstream attitudes toward Native peoples. Our guests this week are Jason Notte, a sports business columnist for MarketWatch.com, as well as Ottawa-based journalist and author Waubgeshig Rice. // Our theme is "nesting" by Birocratic.

May 14, 2016

Recently, Canadian energy giant Enbridge announced it was prepared to boost the Aboriginal stake in their Northern Gateway project up to 33 per cent. Mired in controversy pretty much from the get-go, that includes how it seems to have seeded tension among Indigenous peoples, dividing them into pro- and anti-pipeline camps. But will Enbridge's new offer be enough to win more Indigenous support? Sharing his thoughts: Merle Alexander, a partner and specialist in Aboriginal Law with the law firm Gowlings WLG in Vancouver. // Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

May 6, 2016

This week on the program: the ever-growing economic footprint of Indigenous peoples. A recent report out of Atlantic Canada suggests Aboriginal spending benefits the region significantly, to the tune of $1.14 billion annually. But it's actually a trend across the country. Joining us with her insights into these numbers is Maureen Googoo, owner-editor of Kukukwes.com, a site dedicated to covering Indigenous news in eastern Canada.

// Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Apr 28, 2016

Adopted by most countries back in 2007, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) faced but a handful of holdouts: the USA, Australia, New Zealand and Canada. Flash forward to last week, when a senior Canadian politician said his government was developing a so-called "Canadian definition" of at least some portions of UNDRIP, including the bedrock notion of free, prior and informed Indigenous consent. Helping us to decipher what that could mean going forward is Hayden King, Director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University.

// Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

 

Apr 22, 2016

This week on the program, making sense of Manitoba's Election. As a province with one of Canada's largest proportions of Aboriginal people, it's worth asking what the end of the NDP's 17-year run in favour of the Progressive Conservatives could mean to Indigenous interests going forward. Sharing his thoughts is long-time journalist Trevor Greyeyes, editor of the First Nations Voice newspaper.

// Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Apr 14, 2016

The remote Ontario community of Attawapiskat is but one example of a First Nation caught in the grips of a devastating suicide epidemic. This week, professor of psychiatry Amy Bombay joins us to explore the bigger picture and difficult histories underlying these all-too-common issues facing reserves across Canada.

// Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Apr 8, 2016

Just how much attention have Indigenous issues been getting from the front-runners in the US presidential primaries thus far? Simon Moya-Smith of Indian Country Today fills us in.

Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Apr 1, 2016

"An ongoing medical crisis." According to doctors serving First Nations west of James Bay, that is the current state of Aboriginal health for the northern Ontario region. Dr. James Makokis is a Cree family doctor based in Alberta who also teaches at Yellowhead Tribal College and the Universities of Alberta and Toronto. He shares his perspective on the health care challenges and barriers facing Indigenous communities right across Canada.

Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Mar 25, 2016

Some call it "historic." Its authors say it's "unprecedented." But what does Budget 2016 really offer Indigenous peoples in Canada?

We asked Cindy Blackstock—executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada and an associate professor at the University of Alberta—to help us break it down.

// Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Mar 17, 2016

A United Nations expert review committee recently reported on how well Canada has treated Indigenous peoples under the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Constitutional law researcher and professor Karen Busby outlines some of the issues flagged by the committee.

Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Mar 10, 2016

Russ Diabo, publisher/editor of the First Nations Strategic Bulletin, joins MEDIA INDIGENA's Rick Harp to discuss what, if anything, came out of a recent meeting on climate change between leaders of three national Aboriginal organizations, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Canada's premiers.

 

Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

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